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GypsyR

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Everything posted by GypsyR

  1. When you have an engine dynamically balanced they need the crank, rods with the bolts, pistons, rings, wrist pins, balancer, and the flywheel/flexplate you are going to use. When balancing they don't actually spin balance all your parts, they just want them so they can weigh them. So the pistons, rings, and wrist pins don't need to be assembled. Some builders will only dynamically balance the crankshaft with the flywheel/flexplate and the harmonic balancer and just weight match the other parts. Apparently you can get good results with either method.
  2. On it. If it were me and I didn't want to try a 3.8 flexplate I'd knock a weight off. Then I'd find a ball bearing that fit in the middle of the flexplate (maybe with some temporary glue) and set it up like I was hand balancing a motorcycle or bicycle wheel. That way I could grind off a tad bit more steel if I weren't happy with how neutral it turned out to be. Kind of curious how you ended up with a custom balance engine but it wasn't dynamically balanced before you got your hands on it. My local guy won't balance a crank unless you have all the involved rotating parts there for him.
  3. The PAX looks to be your best choice. At least they SAY it fits. All I know is the 3.8 flexplate I mentioned is zero balance from the factory, is the right diameter with the correct number of teeth, and I think has the correct offset. But the only one I actually have on hand is a flywheel for a 3.8, not a flexplate. Though I do have a 157 tooth 5.0 flywheel handy I'm not at all sure the comparison between those two would translate usually into pertinent info for what you need. I've personally compared the offsets between an AOD/e/4R70W flexplate and one for a C6/E4OD and found the difference surprising small. You about have to use a micrometer to tell them apart. But that tiny difference very much matters. Trying to say though I can do my best to compare two apples I can't say that what I find will the same for two oranges. In fact I doubt it would. By the way, I had to go to Summit and search up what you bought. When I look it says it would be backordered until mid-October. Link: https://www.summitracing.com/parts/pma-pax30210
  4. Sounds like you want to look at a 1998 or so Mustang 3.8 164 tooth flexplate if you want a stocker but it seems to me with what you have going on you might be better off with an aftermarket and custom SFI approved flexplate.
  5. This is the working bay. Pictured in house remodel mode. All the crap on the floor to the right is that stuff (and my chili pot). Router on the left, table saw out, and I forgot why the welder was involved. As much as I hate to say it, the is situation normal. Too much stuff and too little room. As for tools there's an Atlas lathe and Clausing mill lurking back there I guess.
  6. I like cobalt whatevers. Lately I've been using a set from Harbor Freight. I have Drill Doctor I resharpen bits with. I keep a "to do" list on my phone which includes whatever bits I may have broken lately. I tend to pick up single replacements at Northern Tool mostly. I think those are Dewalt. Elsewhere I find Vermont American. I've seen some "cobalt" bits which are sort of rainbow colored. They aren't true cobalts and are instead just coated. I would buy plain black HSS black oxide ones over those. At least they aren't trying to fool me. Actual cobalt bits are a darkish gold color. Brighter gold ones are the titanium coated ones. They're OK until the that microscopic coating wears off (about 2 seconds into a piece of steel) but I wouldn't pay extra for them. Harbor Freight puts a set of their titaniums on sale sometimes as low as $12. They're not great but not bad either. A decent starter set. Just replace the ones you actually use, dull, or break with individual cobalts. If you're like me you'll use the heck out of just a few sizes and the rest will stay like new.
  7. I don't this guy tossing out any actual qualifications other than he authored a book and stood in front of a camera. Plus I might be inclined to give him a tad bit of credit if his personal cars weren't a generation one Prius and a Honda Insight. Jeremy Clarkson once spoke of the Insight as wanting to crash it into a tree just so he wouldn't have to drive it anymore. That and in the one video he claims he wasn't aware of how the curve at the front of "undertrays" had and aero effect. Reading between the lines this tells me this boob has absolutely no qualifications in the field of aerodynamics. Just no way. But as the saying goes "Just because the biggest fool in the world says the sun id shining doesn't make it dark outside." I long since have been quite distracted but about 15 years ago I stocked up on some PVC sheet to do essentially the same sort of things. It and the car are still out there but I'm still quite distracted. Though it may not be clear on every video, allowances are to be made to vent air from underhood. A side effect he mentions of all this that the air directed under the car this way has a bit of venturi effect and will draw that warm out through smaller openings than one might expect. If you do things right. Do a big lower like he shows on his Prius on a Fox Mustang and you will have an overheated engine PDQ. Because those cars draw the air for the radiator from up under the front bumper. I bet he has no clue about that. Aero stuff isn't a one size fits all science. For what little I know about it anyway. Far from an expert me, but I've tried to listen while smart people talked.
  8. I'm rather fond of the original factory IFS. With some upgrades ala Opentracker. I 've noticed that seems to be the preferred way to go with people that autocross and/or do some amateur level open track racing.
  9. Seems like I've seen this thread before somewhere. But anyway.. When people say they want a bunch of power and there's a choice between a smaller engine and a bigger one, the answer is the bigger one. Pretty much just that simple. Getting around 400 HP from a 351W isn't too hard. Stroke it for more. 8 inch rears rule of thumb are good up to 400 HP or so if there's no drag racing with slicks. Sounds like you'll need a 9. The "sub 11 second" thing kind of throws this. Such times aren't that easy to achieve. Plus if you do, they're going to say you have to have a roll cage if you plan to keep going to the track. Have a plan for that? An alternative to all this is to just hotrod the engine and car how you want to with an eye towards improving it's performance. If you forget about focusing on some arbitrary blue sky numbers the whole thing is a LOT more enjoyable. On the other hand, if you intend to use the car for competition then of course you need a thought out plan with realistic goals.
  10. If they went to good home then I guess that's all we could really ask for. (It's like we're talking about kittens here.) :)
  11. I used Google Pics back when it was Picasa and it was OK. Google bought it and changed about everything about how it worked. Ticked me off and I went to Photobucket. They sold out and the new owners decided to charge everyone buckets of money or deal with having a hugely annoying watermark across everything. So I jumped ship again and am now at postimage. Their setup is much like the same Winkflash, Picasa, Photobucket formula so easy to get a handle on if you've used similar software. I think about three years now without them doing anything stupid so I'm quite happy with them. Winkflash did something to annoy me. Too long ago and I can't remember.
  12. If not then I need them. You take Paypal? (For the shipping)
  13. I put a 1403 on our '96 5.0 over ten years ago. New to me at the time and I had my doubts. Still on there and I wouldn't trade it. The 500 cfm is a perfect match for all around driving with a little foolishness on occasion. The AVS with the annular boosters would be even better. Now that I say it. OK, maybe I would trade that old Edelbrock. :)
  14. Is it me or does that appear to be a "China" relay? I don't even give those relays the benefit of a doubt anymore, straight ou tof the box and into the trash they go. If it's not a Bosch or a Potter-Brumfield I won't use it. Seriously, I've had some really stupid issues with China relays.
  15. Over the years I've fixed a couple of Fords (and one Dodge) that no one else could with a store full of alternators by simply adding a ground wire from the case to the ground point where engine block ground strap is. Or is supposed to be. You'd think it would be grounded by the bolts and brackets but in at least a couple of cases it was not and I proved it. After the second one I fixed it became my habit to add a ground wire to every alternator I owned that didn't have one already. The last one I caught I had since learned about voltage drop testing and was able to isolate the trouble area. Out of curiosity. It was between the case itself and the steel bracket. The aluminum case can develop a surface oxidation that apparently won't conduct electricity. Just like a coat of paint. Do you NEED a ground? Probably not. I've seen hundreds of vehicles that didn't have or need one. But I've seen it be an issue a couple of times and ground straps are cheap. It's not going to ever be an issue on MY cars.
  16. Good street performance is most often satisfactorily found with a planned combination of many small things, rather than making one or two changes and expecting a fire breathing monster. People have been porting these heads for many many years. Even after the aluminum heads became common they were still performance go-to heads in certain types of racing where choices were restricted to stock parts. Probably not really worth doing if you have to pay somebody full retail. If you want to do it yourself or can get a buddy deal on the labor, then do it. The recipes are out there to follow. Last I paid attention we weren't taking the "hump" all the way out. The guys with flow benches are saying to just reduce its height and give it a teardrop shape these days. If you plan to DIY you'd want to look all that up so as to have a good plan of attack. If you grind too much out of the wrong area you can literally turn a good head into unfixable scrap. Though a Dremel and it's 1/8" tooling is great to have, it's really only good for the final polishing and detailing. You really need a high speed 1/4" grinder for porting cast iron. Seriously, that power drill you have WON'T do it. Carbide bits don't work well at all unless they are spinning a lot faster than a drill can go. So porting some heads requires investing in a bit of equipment along with the time.
  17. Part of this is why some people say old vehicles have "personality", you have to get to know what they "like" and "don't like". Sounds like you are on the way. Another thought, when I feel like the engine is still pretty hot after stopping at the store or for a quick lunch I will take care not to tough the accelerator pedal at all, just turn the key. Most of the time it works best for me. If not then I will put the pedal down pretty far and hold it and continue cranking it like that. Three of my vehicles like this but a fourth does better if the throttle is cracked open just a bit.
  18. Kind of odd choices there. "Posi" is Chevrolet rear and "Danas" tend to be found under Dodges. What exactly do you want the car to do? What engine and transmission are in it (or will be in it?)
  19. Thanks. I have not noticed those during my recreational catalog browsings and didn't know they existed.
  20. I've seen the electric modification done here and there but never one with the turn signals too. Nice! Is that a modified original glass, a trimmed other-brand glass or what?
  21. I have no doubt, many people report they like their Nu-Relics just fine. However "modern" GM window motor caught my eye and tickled me. That motor design GM started using way back in 1982. 37 years ago, modern indeed. :) No worries about the actual design, though. They are very robust and reliable motors. Very much more durable (and more compact) than the Ford motors of the same era.
  22. I see a lot of people adding coolers apparently because they think it's a good idea or they've read advertising from the people who sell add-on aftermarket coolers but I often wonder how many people actually have used a temperature gauges to determine that they actually need one. Not many I expect. Lots of people seem to be concerned with cooling but hardly any seem interested into taking into account that a transmission also needs to come up to operating temperature. Mostly because if it doesn't then the condensation buildup in it isn't vaporized. And moisture is a mortal enemy of clutch material. If you insist on running a cooler without actually knowing whether you need one or not, at least install a thermostatic bypass. They essentially work the same as the engine coolant thermostat, only allowing cooling as needed. Bargain hunters can find them on 2000 up F150's and Taurus's (that I know of, probably others too.) If you can flare tubing, they are easy to fit. Such bypasses work great on engine oil coolers too but I don't know of any OEM ones practical for retrofitting.
  23. Interesting take on that part. My first thought on duplicating one was some round mild steel stock combined with some blacksmithing.
  24. I've been fooling with cars for a few years now. I've come to feel I'd very much prefer modification/repair work done by someone who actually CARES about what he is doing along with having the skills. There's a pretty big difference between a workman and a craftsman and their end products. The reason factories do spot welding is that's it cheap and fast. Basically the minimum necessary to produce parts quickly. People that work in such situations tend to take the same mindset, don't do what's best, do what keeps the production numbers up and keeps the bosses happy with the least effort on their part. Due to my unscientific and anecdotal observations of what happens in crashes and from taking stuff apart, I'm not personally terribly impressed by "factory spot welds".
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