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foothilltom

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Everything posted by foothilltom

  1. Brilliant diagnosis, Coz. The system works again.
  2. I think this discussion was fascinating. I don't know about your experience, but I am pretty certain a similar discussion happening on any other forum would have degenerated into name-calling and insults. This forum is populated by intelligent (present company excluded), self-effacing, and humble folks who can disagree yet still remain completely civil and informative. Well done, dammit. Tom
  3. Well, I think we're all right. (And it's always cool to disagree, that's how we learn). My comment (agreeing with MP) was that increasing mechanical advantage would not actually provide more braking power. Your comment about sufficient pressure at the wheel cylinder is totally relevant, though I was assuming that was not an issue. If there is not sufficient pressure to push out the pistons of the wheel cylinder, there is a big problem. Given edwards last comment about pumping the pedal to build up pressure, I would back up and suspect more elementary problems (air in the lines, bad MC, etc.). I'm interested in hearing edwards answers to CARs last question.
  4. Agreed with Power Maximus. Assuming your wheel cylinders are working and your shoes are good, you're not going to see any benefit by adding mechanical advantage. 4 wheel drums just don't match the stopping power of discs, but you will get used to it. You just learn to plan ahead and be more alert. Plenty of folks got by just fine over the decades with drums, but if you're used to a modern car, it's a big culture shock. That said, I upgraded my boys drums on his 69 coupe to front discs mostly to satisfy his mother. She is still on me to add an airbag :) Good luck, Tom
  5. I find it helpful to review the various "circuits" in a typical carb to better diagnose stuff like this. Your "idle circuit" is adjusted as rangerdoc suggested. I'd be surprised if a rich idle circuit is to blame given how little fuel is actually involved here, but it's possible. You also said that the rich behavior occurs with "around town" driving, which would tend to steer me away from the idle circuit. As a test, you could clean up your plugs, re-install, and let the motor run at idle only for a few minutes. Stand behind the car and see if you can detect a rich smell from the exhaust. Pull a plug and check for the tell-tale rich signs. If so, lean out the idle-mixture screws as Ranger suggested. The fuel level in your bowl dramatically impacts the hydrostatic pressure that feeds the jets. If the fuel level is too high, ouila, rich. With the engine running at idle, check the sight screw and make sure fuel is just barely reaching the bottom of the hole. Fuel should just trickle out if at all. If you get more of a stream of fuel, adjust your float/needle. Your jets control the amount of fuel in your primary circuit. It's possible somebody reamed out those 50's over the years. Jets are super-cheap so I might suggest (assuming the above is all good) you buy 48's (don't step down more than 2) and install them. Your primary circuit is my #1 suspect given your description. The Power Valve can be troublesome. It is rated to open at a certain level of vacuum to provide additional fuel during acceleration (when vacuum drops). The rebuild kits don't often tell you what type of PV they come with and you can easily wind up installing one that opens too soon (rich) or too late (lean). In your case, you could even consider installing a plug instead of a PV and see if this helps your rich behavior. The Accel pump is among the suspects, but I'm thinking to a much lesser degree. Let us know how you do! Good luck. Tom
  6. I find it helpful to review the various "circuits" in a typical carb to better diagnose stuff like this. Your "idle circuit" is adjusted as rangerdoc suggested. I'd be surprised if a rich idle circuit is to blame given how little fuel is actually involved here, but it's possible. You also said that the rich behavior occurs with "around town" driving, which would tend to steer me away from the idle circuit. As a test, you could clean up your plugs, re-install, and let the motor run at idle only for a few minutes. Stand behind the car and see if you can detect a rich smell from the exhaust. Pull a plug and check for the tell-tale rich signs. If so, lean out the idle-mixture screws as Ranger suggested. The fuel level in your bowl dramatically impacts the hydrostatic pressure that feeds the jets. If the fuel level is too high, ouila, rich. With the engine running at idle, check the sight screw and make sure fuel is just barely reaching the bottom of the hole. Fuel should just trickle out if at all. If you get more of a stream of fuel, adjust your float/needle. Your jets control the amount of fuel in your primary circuit. It's possible somebody reamed out those 50's over the years. Jets are super-cheap so I might suggest (assuming the above is all good) you buy 48's (don't step down more than 2) and install them. Your primary circuit is my #1 suspect given your description. The Power Valve can be troublesome. It is rated to open at a certain level of vacuum to provide additional fuel during acceleration (when vacuum drops). The rebuild kits don't often tell you what type of PV they come with and you can easily wind up installing one that opens too soon (rich) or too late (lean). In your case, you could even consider installing a plug instead of a PV and see if this helps your rich behavior. The Accel pump is among the suspects, but I'm thinking to a much lesser degree. Let us know how you do! Good luck. Tom
  7. So what was the resolution to your "car not starting" problem? It's quite helpful to know so your experience can be used for future advice. Regarding your header/clutch question, clutch linkage (cable) fit problems are quite common with headers. This is one reason why I opted for stock manifolds for my 351W. Headers made everything a PITA and the performance penalty is pretty negligible for my setup. Anywho, you're going to have to re-route your clutch cable. I'm sure some of the guys here have clutch cable experiences with headers, but I got sick of the long tubes getting in the way of every little thing. The simple joys of removing spark plugs easily... Good luck.
  8. So what was the resolution to your "car not starting" problem? It's quite helpful to know so your experience can be used for future advice. Regarding your header/clutch question, clutch linkage (cable) fit problems are quite common with headers. This is one reason why I opted for stock manifolds for my 351W. Headers made everything a PITA and the performance penalty is pretty negligible for my setup. Anywho, you're going to have to re-route your clutch cable. I'm sure some of the guys here have clutch cable experiences with headers, but I got sick of the long tubes getting in the way of every little thing. The simple joys of removing spark plugs easily... Good luck.
  9. I may have this all backwards, but I thought vacuum decreases quickly as the throttle opens. If this is true, increasing the idle would actually decrease vacuum and hamper the booster even more? The highest vacuum should be with a closed throttle and higher RPMs (like getting off the gas at reasonably high RPMs with clutch disengaged). If this is true (and I'm wrong constantly), I would think your best braking pattern would be when you stay off the clutch until the very last second and downshift through braking. At idle, you're pretty much stuck with whatever vacuum your setup makes, but increasing the idle seems like the wrong approach. I'm over my head, but thought I'd contribute my requisite $.02. Tom
  10. I may have this all backwards, but I thought vacuum decreases quickly as the throttle opens. If this is true, increasing the idle would actually decrease vacuum and hamper the booster even more? The highest vacuum should be with a closed throttle and higher RPMs (like getting off the gas at reasonably high RPMs with clutch disengaged). If this is true (and I'm wrong constantly), I would think your best braking pattern would be when you stay off the clutch until the very last second and downshift through braking. At idle, you're pretty much stuck with whatever vacuum your setup makes, but increasing the idle seems like the wrong approach. I'm over my head, but thought I'd contribute my requisite $.02. Tom
  11. I was under the impression that a voltage regulator is a solid-state device with no adjustments. It either works or it doesn't. As always, I could be wrong (and often am).
  12. I'm intrigued, Pak. Can you point me to some "up close" pics of your setup? I've already deviated from stock with my newly installed exhaust setup (didn't go with the transverse, single muffler), so I'm slowly moving toward restomod anyway. Thanks in advance. Tom
  13. Much appreciated, boys! I am going to order something up this weekend for a next-weekend project. Thanks! Tom
  14. I'm way over my head here, but I can tell an experience I had. My 351W had what I would describe as a tapping/ringing sound at higher RPMs. Definitely got louder with increased RPMs. Turned out to be a rocker arm stud had pushed out slightly, raising the rocker off of the valve and creating a helluva racket. The push rod was all dicked up as well. Good luck.
  15. Howdy gents, I'm looking for input on an aftermarket tach. My coupe is a 4-speed with no factory tach (a terrible thing) and I'm looking to put one in. I would prefer something small-ish so it doesn't stick out like a sore thumb, but big enough to see. So some specific quesitons: * Recommendations on brand/size * Recommendations on location per the above I was thinking of mounting something directly below the dash pad between the two main gauges. Ideas and suggestions are most welcome. Pictures would even be more appreciated! Thanks, Tom
  16. So.....did you buy this coupe or take a pass? You'd think someone who references The Beatles in their subject line would follow up. :)
  17. If you're interested in ruling out bad fuel, disconnect the fuel line to the carb, crank the engine for several seconds to drain out the bowl. Then shoot some starting fluid (don't need a lot) down the primaries and immediately try to start it. You will definitely hear it *wanting* to start as someone else mentioned. If this doesn't work, your fuel is fine and you should start progressing through the other ideas: * Super-Rich mixture (check the plugs as bigperm said, try starting with WOT) * Timing off 180 * Good coil, properly wired? * Points gapped correctly? (This is huge) How are you verifying that you have good spark? How do you know you have it properly timed if it has never started? Good luck, you'll whip it. Tom
  18. I'm thinking this is the same coupe I saw on Craigslist yesterday. http://sfbay.craigslist.org/sby/cto/1763642089.html He has it listed for $5K which is a bit high, but if you have him down to $3500 then good on you! I was put off by the "rust out" as that can be a nightmare and tons of dough. Like somebody said, a two-owner car is a good thing and the original build sheet will definitely help for resale down the line if you restore it. Pictures on craig's generally look 3x better than the actual car, so I'd lay eyeballs on this thing before getting too serious. Best of luck! Tom
  19. [ATTACH]6767[/ATTACH] This is most likely a stock setup, but you can never be too sure with wiring. Its from a GT coupe with the stock non-functional scoop and embedded turn signal lamps. Tom
  20. Did your surging problems begin with the migration of the battery to the trunk? Was that the only change you made prior to you noticing the problem? Voltage drop is relevant depending on the length and gauge of the wire, but given the distances involved here, I can't imagine that's an issue. Even if it were, it wouldn't produce a surging effect, just reduced voltage consistently. I would suspect your voltage regulator. Its job is to "smooth out" the voltage generated by your charging system. Its a pretty cheap part, but I normally like to diagnose more thoroughly before I buy stuff. If you can reproduce the surging behavior in the driveway, get a meter on there and see what you're producing at idle, then rev it up to cruising RPMs and see what gives. Good luck. Tom
  21. Here's a really good YouTube video that shows a strategy for locating a short. He uses a circuit breaker wired across the fuse panel which is pretty cool (instead of just popping fuse after fuse). After that he's just "dividing and conquering" by disconnecting convenient points in the circuit along the way. I think this is a pretty intuitive approach. Try it out...the example in the vid is a short when activating the horn! Tom
  22. My advice: use your horn in emergencies only. :) Seriously, you have a short in your horn circuit. You'll blow a fuse every time and you don't want to keep increasing the size of the fuse unless you want to melt something or start a fire. Diagnosing a short is kind of a pain, but if you approach it methodically, you can do it. You'll want to get used to using a multi-meter (one that measures resistance as well as voltage). Basically, you're looking for a low-resistance situation that, for example, could be caused by a horn wire exposed and grounding against the frame. Fortunately, the horn circuit is pretty dang simple. You could also try disconnecting one horn at a time and seeing if this eliminates the problem, but you'll go through several fuses along the way. There are a few things to suspect: * Short in your actual horn switch (below the wheel) * Short in your wheel hub (that activates the switch) * Short in one of the wires to the horns (suspect those near sharp corners) * Short in the horns themselves You can test each of these circuits with your multi-meter. I can provide more info later if you need it. Get a wiring diagram if you can't trace the wires back from the horns. Good luck. Tom
  23. Methinks you will want to remove the speedo cable before removing the gauge pod. There is probably a little plastic sleeve on the speedo cable connection to your speedo whose purpose is to lock the cable in place. It might have broken off over time. Just rotate that sleeve out of the way and pull straight back on the cable toward the front of the car. It might seem stuck, but there's nothing else holding it on there, so have at it. You could consider detaching the speedo cable from the tranny first and pulling it through the underside of the car, through the firewall and out as you remove your gauge cluster with the cable attached, but this sounds like a pain. Good luck. Tom
  24. And before you lose any sleep over it, I've only seen the parking brake illuminate the "Brake System" light on a Grande that I bought as a parts car. I don't have that car anymore and never took the time to see how it was wired. The 2 other coupes I have now don't set the Brake system light via the parking brake, so it might be a Grande-only thing. I'm sure the fellas here know the actual option.
  25. I'm 99% there was no buzzer. You have some kind of Seat Belt relay that turns off after 5 seconds. I'm pretty sure that's the standard setup though I have no such relay in my coupe. My Seat Belt light goes out immediately when the ignition is in start. There's a Brake System light on the left that should illuminate under the following conditions (i'm pretty certain of this): * Parking Brake set * Some kind of problem in your brake system (proportioning valve ball is not centered) * Maybe another reason To relic: my Brake System light would stay on forever as well if not for unplugging the socket on the proportioning valve. Haven't solved that one yet, but I think you're in good company.
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