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Floridastang

Transmission coolers

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428 SCJ drag packs put it offset to the left of the radiator. I don't have an AC car so I don't know how much room is left up there. I didn't want to put mine in front of the radiator but couldn't find another spot. 

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You could also get one from a 92-2000 Explorer, or a 1998 + up Ranger, they are mounted on the r/s of the radiator support in front of the a/c condenser. very easy to get at from under the front of the truck. See link for a pic of the trans cooler.

https://www.rockauto.com/en/moreinfo.php?pk=7165764&cc=1362798&jsn=598

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On 2/24/2019 at 10:24 PM, RPM said:

428 SCJ drag packs put it offset to the left of the radiator. I don't have an AC car so I don't know how much room is left up there. I didn't want to put mine in front of the radiator but couldn't find another spot. 

Wasn’t that the engine oil cooler on SCJ’s?  I thought the (auto) trans cooler was only ever built into the radiator?

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17 hours ago, mqu02 said:

Wasn’t that the engine oil cooler on SCJ’s?  I thought the (auto) trans cooler was only ever built into the radiator?

Damn, right you are. My error. 

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On 2/26/2019 at 1:36 PM, Floridastang said:

Nice thanks. Do you use the radiator cooler as well?

If your rad has a trans cooler and the engine does not run hot, yes, you should use the rad trans cooler in addition to an aftermarket trans cooler IF you use a small aftermarket trans cooler, because the water temp will be less than the trans fluid temp once everything is up to operating temp, therefore the 180 - 190 degree water temp will cool the 200 + degree trans fluid. i would run the trans fluid thru the rad first, then thru the aftermarket cooler.

You can mount it to the front drivers side of the core support where the drag pak engine oil cooler mounts then move the passenger side horn to the passenger side like a drag pak. the drag pak horn bracket and horn wire are available. you should have at least 3/4" of air apace between the cooler and the ac condenser.

there are many good aftermarket oil coolers. i for one would not use a used oil cooler cuz it may be grungy inside and possibly even rusty. its just not worth the risk imo.

..................................1970_ford_mustang_boss_302_engine_bay.jp

 

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 So why are you adding another trans fluid cooler? I've read that you only need them if you tow, or if your torque converter is a higher stall than stock. 

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38 minutes ago, RPM said:

 So why are you adding another trans fluid cooler? I've read that you only need them if you tow, or if your torque converter is a higher stall than stock. 

...or if you live in bakersfield or phoenix or vegas.

 

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On 2/26/2019 at 2:47 PM, 69Stanger408 said:

B&M. Moved AC to pass side to clean up AC lines which run between the fender and engine bay

cooler.jpg

I am using this B&M model as well, with AC. Made some brakets out of aluminum, bolted right up to the top and bottom condensor. Works well.

20190303_103534.jpg

20190303_103617.jpg

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On 2/28/2019 at 8:26 PM, barnett468 said:

If your rad has a trans cooler and the engine does not run hot, yes, you should use the rad trans cooler in addition to an aftermarket trans cooler IF you use a small aftermarket trans cooler, because the water temp will be less than the trans fluid temp once everything is up to operating temp, therefore the 180 - 190 degree water temp will cool the 200 + degree trans fluid. i would run the trans fluid thru the rad first, then thru the aftermarket cooler.

You can mount it to the front drivers side of the core support where the drag pak engine oil cooler mounts then move the passenger side horn to the passenger side like a drag pak. the drag pak horn bracket and horn wire are available. you should have at least 3/4" of air apace between the cooler and the ac condenser.

there are many good aftermarket oil coolers. i for one would not use a used oil cooler cuz it may be grungy inside and possibly even rusty. its just not worth the risk imo.

..................................1970_ford_mustang_boss_302_engine_bay.jp

 

Exectly! I ran mine through the trans cooler and then the B&M, then back to the trans.

20190303_103534.jpg

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3 hours ago, Floridastang said:

Did you support the cooler on both sides I can only see one bracket in the picture.  Which cooler model did you use?

I believe it is the 70268 model and yes it is supported on both sides with same brackets.

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I intentionally used a radiator with no integral trans cooler, as I am running a Windsor based stroker, which will likely run hot, and also will be using the A/C in the summer.  So, I wanted my transmission cooler to be totally separate from my engine cooling system.

Fortunately, Fluidyne is located close to me in NASCAR country, and they used one of their standard sized cooler packages and slightly modified it so it would fit my car.  I have two 5 inch fans that use a temperature sensor that is mounted directly in my transmission pan.  I have a C-6, with a larger pan.

 

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I see a lot of people adding coolers apparently  because they think it's a good idea or they've read advertising from the people who sell add-on aftermarket coolers but I often wonder how many people actually have used a temperature gauges to determine that they actually need one. Not many I expect. Lots of people seem to be concerned with cooling but hardly any seem interested into taking into account that a transmission also needs to come up to operating temperature. Mostly because if it doesn't then the condensation buildup in it isn't vaporized. And moisture is a mortal enemy of clutch material.

If you insist on running a cooler without actually knowing whether you need one or not, at least install a thermostatic bypass. They essentially work the same as the engine coolant thermostat, only allowing cooling as needed. Bargain hunters can find them on 2000 up F150's and Taurus's (that I know of, probably others too.)  If you can flare tubing, they are easy to fit.

Such bypasses work great on engine oil coolers too but I don't know of any OEM ones practical for retrofitting.

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