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Well, now that I have finally acquired my grandpa's 1969 Mustang he bought new, after buying it from my aunt, the work begins.

I don't think the car has been on the road since 1989, so I'm going through all the systems to get it road worthy.

The break lines are shot, so I have a line kit ordered. And I'm replacing all wheel cylinders and rubber break lines. Break pads and hubs still look surprisingly good.

Gas tank had about 4 gallons of nasty brown crud. So the old tank is out, and I bought a new one.

I have already soaked and rebuilt the carb. It was froze up.

Leaf springs look terrible, so replacing them, too.

Dash pad was baked, and the bezel above glove box was cracked. I replaced both.

I found some rot under the battery tray into the frame. I assume from a leaky battery at one time. I also found some rust on the trunk extensions by lower rear fenders along with a couple other spots on the car. Thankfully the floors, frame, and trunk pan are solid. At some point I will tear down the car completely apart to do a full blown rotisserie restoration.

But for now I'm just going to drive the car as it is.

 

 

 

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I like your plan of just getting the car roadworthy and enjoying driving the car, the interior looks to be in very good condition anyway, well done, i bet you can't wait to get in on the road.

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23 hours ago, 69RavenConv said:

 

That's impressive, I had to use sawzalls and angle grinders to get mine off  :)

X2 I had to use a large cut off wheel on my angle grinder to cut the front leaf spring bolts to get them out.

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Nice story! Nice car!  I was in the same boat, mine sat for 33 years. On mine, it was started every few months for 7 years. This just gunked up the top end of the motor and 5 valves stuck resulting in bending push rods and popping one rocker stud. Point being, if you can't spin the motor pretty easy with a wrench on the harmonic balancer you might want to check more things! :)

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10 hours ago, TinMan said:

Nice story! Nice car!  I was in the same boat, mine sat for 33 years. On mine, it was started every few months for 7 years. This just gunked up the top end of the motor and 5 valves stuck resulting in bending push rods and popping one rocker stud. Point being, if you can't spin the motor pretty easy with a wrench on the harmonic balancer you might want to check more things! :)

I pulled the plugs, and squirted marvel mystery oil in all the cylinders. I let it set a week before I tried spinning it by hand. It wasn't frozen at all, and spun fairly easy.

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Found some bad rust on the passenger side front frame rail. Also a large hole under the battery tray. There is another bad spot on the lower frame rail near the cowl of the passenger side. And a couple bad spots on the upper inner fenders where they bolt with the fenders. 

So I took the front end off, and will need to pull the motor and trans to be able to make the repair.

Both front fenders are mint. No rust at all. :-)

The front frame rail replacements and lower frame repair piece were less than $100 total. So that's good. But I'll have a few hours into fixing it correctly. 

While the motor and trans are out, I'll go through them too.

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The rust holes on the top of the inner fender panels is common on 69/70 Mustangs my 69 Coupe had it in 4 spots I had to patch, & the bottom of the battery tray is from battery acid, also very common which mine had also.

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2 minutes ago, Bill Bailey said:

Will do. Thanks

Easy way is to run water with a hose  into cowl, on both sides one at a time and watch the water run or drip inside. Your floor board pictures, especially the drivers side looks like cowl leak to me.

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On 03/04/2018 at 5:15 PM, aslanefe said:

Easy way is to run water with a hose  into cowl, on both sides one at a time and watch the water run or drip inside. Your floor board pictures, especially the drivers side looks like cowl leak to me.

Cowl doesn't leak. :-)

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