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Ridge Runner

Aluminum and pot metal repair

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Almost seems too good to be true. I was thinking this would be perfect to fix a broken ear on a c6 I have stashed away. Might have to look into this.

Thanks for sharing.

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9 minutes ago, jmlay said:

Almost seems too good to be true. I was thinking this would be perfect to fix a broken ear on a c6 I have stashed away. Might have to look into this.

Thanks for sharing.

tig welding is much stronger

 

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I havent used this yet but i did try somthing similar .the problem was you had to heat the base metal to much and sometimes it would melt before it would weld ,i would like to try this though ,especially if it will build up missing pieces

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1 hour ago, Ridge Runner said:

I havent used this yet but i did try somthing similar .the problem was you had to heat the base metal to much and sometimes it would melt before it would weld ,i would like to try this though ,especially if it will build up missing pieces

i have used it several times and it looks 1,000 times easier to use in the video than it actually is. it probably took that guy 1 full year of practice to be able to do that.

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On 1/10/2018 at 10:22 AM, danno said:

How hot do you need to get it?  Does it require the temperature of solder or braze?   I assume propane will not get it hot enough.

propane is hot enough to melt the thin aluma rod but if you are welding to a thick piece of metal, good luck with that.

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The biggest issue I see with the HTS rod is that it doesn't completely melt until it hits 737 degrees, probably too hot for pot metal applications. The Muggy weld alloy #1 melts at 350 degrees, more of a solder than a brazing rod and much more suitable for white metal applications. 

I'm sure the HTS has an application that it will excel at, but like everything else, one size does not fit all. 

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On ‎1‎/‎9‎/‎2018 at 8:58 PM, Ridge Runner said:

I havent used this yet but i did try somthing similar .the problem was you had to heat the base metal to much and sometimes it would melt before it would weld ,i would like to try this though ,especially if it will build up missing pieces

I used Muggy Weld and it was like that. They recommended a 000 acetylene torch as low as I could adjust it. Still too hot. It was very difficult to use. I was repairing Ford/Mercury aluminum trim moldings. I somewhat gave up. This may be better. Thanks  

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On 1/10/2018 at 8:36 AM, redmastercraft said:

I used the muggy weld product on the headlight buckets on my 70 and it came out great...you have to be careful not to heat it too much and had to use a bunch of flux

hmmmm...where can i get muggy rod? i need to just barely tack weld 5/16 plate together.

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When doing repairs on the light bucket tab I found that using a tig welder and making a rod out of pot metal material works best. I was lucky enough to have an old quarter extension that I used to make up some rods . 

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