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Mike65

V-6 Ford Contour Electric cooling fan controller.

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I'm not sure this is the controller Ford used.  Ford used a resistor, temp sender, 2 relays, and other bits to make the fan 2 speed.  When I look at the controller you posted, but on Summit Racing and Amazon, it says universal.  This controller looks like it is a relay that kicks on once a temperature (set by the owner) is reached but is just a single speed.  Unless I'm reading something wrong.  I don't think it is a bad way to go if you don't want to spend the money on a more advanced controller.  I would note the reviews on Summit for the part is 2.8 of 5 and Amazon is better at 3.7 of 5.

Also you'll need to use some kind of t-connector I think to run a gauge and this controller.

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I think there are a lot of options out there.  One thing to look for is something that can handle the draw of 2 fans starting up.  Possibly surging to 45amp.  If you want all the features and one of the best controllers out there DCC Control is hard to beat, but it will take 6-10 weeks to get delivered and is expensive.  Besides the DCC Control you can normally get versions with Radiator Probes or Temp Sensor.  The probe works fine for me but some people don't like them.  It looks like BE Cool has some now too but I don't see any reviews.  Also Painless has some but they are over $200.  I saw a lot of posts when I researched doing the dual contour fan setup of people using Flex-a-lite controls as well.

http://www.dccontrol.com/constant_temperature_controllers.htm

I had looked at some flex-a-lite controls too

This one is basic and handles 2 fans it also allows a manual switch if you want a little control:

https://www.summitracing.com/parts/flx-30332

Here is another Flex-a-lite controller that has soft start (variable speed) and dual + AC Relay and Manual Override  But again it is up there in price
https://www.summitracing.com/parts/flx-31165

 

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I'm using the FK45 from DCC.  It took a while to get and the Customer Service at DCC is unique but I really like the controller so far.  It's been in about 8 months.  The only thing I might do differently is the placement of the controller.  I put it on the bottom of the shroud to hide it (see in read).  But now I worry about it get wet and it is a pain in @$$ to adjust (though this won't need to be done again once you're dialed in) as I have to crawl under the wheel to see what I'm doing.  So if I was to do it today I'd put the controller on the top of the shroud (see green circle).  

Are you planning on running a higher output alternator?

20160815_191213c.jpg

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I upgraded to a 3G that is 120 or 130amp.  But if you get a 100amp 1 wire you should be fine (don't forget to upgrade your charging wire).   Also you'll have to do something about the ampmeter if you have one in your gauge cluster because they can burn out with the higher amp alternator.  I don't know if affects the warning light the same way.  I honestly never checked the draw myself but I've seen but I've seen that they pull up to 30amps full on and might spike higher.  With a variable speed controller I believe you avoid the spike and will only be full on at low driving speed or on really hot days so the amps at cruise should be lower than 30amp.

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I have been following the thread and storing the info away in my mental rollerdex for later. Some good info.

Is anyone using an airflow switch to turn off the fan when there is enough forward speed to cool without a fan?

Aircraft use switches like this for various applications including recording flight time and activating undercarriage etc.

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2 hours ago, MN69Grande said:

I upgraded to a 3G that is 120 or 130amp.  But if you get a 100amp 1 wire you should be fine (don't forget to upgrade your charging wire).   Also you'll have to do something about the ampmeter if you have one in your gauge cluster because they can burn out with the higher amp alternator.  I don't know if affects the warning light the same way.  I honestly never checked the draw myself but I've seen but I've seen that they pull up to 30amps full on and might spike higher.  With a variable speed controller I believe you avoid the spike and will only be full on at low driving speed or on really hot days so the amps at cruise should be lower than 30amp.

There is no wiring in the car, I am going to completely rewire it with an AAW kit for the 69 Mustang. https://www.summitracing.com/parts/aww-510177

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Maybe someone else with a little more knowledge can chime in.  The kit you linked to has an 8 Gauge feed for the alternator.   I honestly don't know if that is adequate for 100amp. 

This Chart is the first thing that came up on Google.
http://www.offroaders.com/technical/12-volt-wiring-tech-gauge-to-amps/

Which seems to indicate that a short run of 5 feet or less your ok. 

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On 6/10/2017 at 8:00 AM, Mike65 said:

I sent an e mail to AAW asking if the 8 gauge feed for the alternator will handle a 100 amp alternator. I will post the answer once I hear back from them.

 

Looking forward to seeing their response, Mike. Please post. I'm considering the same route as you and have had some private conversation with Matt (MN69Grande) on this as well. Thanks again, Matt.   

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OK everyone that is following this I got an answer back from AAW today the person that responded to my E-mail stated the AAW kit with the 8 gauge alternator feed wire will support a 1 wire alternator of 100 amps. They recommend upgrading the alternator feed wire if you were to use an alternator higher then 120 amps. 

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Having read this post when you first posted it I did some research for myself for my car. I found a few people using this item.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/322274915905?_trksid=p2060353.m1438.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT

 

I haven't heard great things about it per say but it seems hit and miss. You may have already seen this one.

 

When the time comes to install a fan on my vehicle I'm not using a controller and the fan will be on all the time when the car is on. I had an old fox body Mustang set up this way with no issues and it was a daily driver.

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I was originally going to use a DCC but today i was reading that the owner/builder is a huge PITA to get a hold of if you need anything lots of people said to stay away from that guy on a different forum. 

Now I chose to go with a Ron Francis ar88

https://www.ronfrancis.com/prodinfo.asp?number=AR-88

Yes it's pricey but I don't mind paying a little extra for quality products that's not going to overheat my $$$ engine

I haven't seen anything bad about these guys and I keep seeing they have great support 

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Here is an awesome little controller I use for one of my setups.  Capable of dual fan control if you use the output plus alarm setting for hi and low.  You can also see the temps and monitor when the controller is on and what state (Hi or low).  I love this thing and it's lased about 8 years and still going.  I tried the DCC controller and it failed after about 18 months.  I was very disappointed in the DCC controller but like the idea.  I set up the Auber controller to do the same thing,  Turns it self off at a certain temp.  I think it's worth checking out.  You will need relays.  I used solid state relays with the Contour fan set up.  The solid state relays get expensive as the current goes up.  Keep that in mind.

https://www.auberins.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=1&products_id=83

Cheers, Tony

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On ‎6‎/‎8‎/‎2017 at 12:36 AM, bigmal said:

I have been following the thread and storing the info away in my mental rollerdex for later. Some good info.

Is anyone using an airflow switch to turn off the fan when there is enough forward speed to cool without a fan?

Aircraft use switches like this for various applications including recording flight time and activating undercarriage etc.

I have not verified, but in general, if a  DC voltage motor has something tuning it other than itself, it will act like a generator and push power out rather than consume power ( if you know what I mean?).   What this means is that if  the fan normally has  maybe 10 cubic feet per minute of airflow when operated by the car with the car not moving.  It might take 30 amps at 12 volts to do this.  If you are driving  maybe 50 miles per hour, the airflow from the car moving could be 10 cubic feet per second.   So the fan takes no power from the car to operate.  if you were to go 100 mph, the fan could act as a generator and actually supply power to your car. 

It would be an interesting thing to test, but I would bet the current required to operate the fan goes down as the speed of the car increases.  So there should be no need to shut it off  when the car is moving.

MN69Grande,  I can put a current meter on your car next summer and see what happens.   We could also get a realistic idea of how much actual current is needed, if you are interested.    I still have the factory fan.

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I use a cheap auto zone controller with temp probe in the intake, and have 2 relays wired that actually take the load of the fans coming on.

The sensor reads that its time to come on and tells the relays and the relays switch powa on and voila fans blow at high speed...been working like a charm for 3 years now.

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I ended up going with the one I posted from Jegs 2 circuit breakers & 2 fan relays, 1 for each fan.

http://www.jegs.com/i/JEGS/555/10570/10002/-1?CAWELAID=1710796803&CAGPSPN=pla&CAAGID=39714413703&CATCI=aud-300525381059:pla-171301206551&CATARGETID=230006180039220984&cadevice=c&gclid=Cj0KEQjwyZjKBRDu--WG9ayT_ZEBEiQApZBFuH1-7uwCly2Svb-lgBbMYWuFo6LIRrcZHDebo-KzgBYaAsXX8P8HAQ

Here  is where I  mounted the circuit breakers for the fan relays. The instructions say to mount the circuit breakers as close to the power source as possible.

55903-9-3-17-installed-circuit-breakers-

Here is where I mounted the relays.

55850-8-30-17-started-running-wiring-coo

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Yeah, nice setup.  I like the circuit breakers instead of fuses.  The cool thing about that set up is that if you trip one breaker, you still have one fan left.   Might be a tight squeeze to land the battery cable on that left solenoid post with 2 lugs already on it.

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