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Vicfreg

1970 Convertible Restoration

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Hey Sven, good advice.  The truck one will work just fine.   I have posted some pictures of the 2 master cylinders side by side.  One is the 2000 Mustang, which has the passenger side ports, the other is the 1992 Ford Ranger, which has the drivers side ports.   They are dimensionally identical.  The brake booster rod depth is exactly the same, as is the bore.  The truck version has a slightly larger reservoir, and it has 2 different ISO-Metric port sizes.  One is 10mm the other is 12mm.  On the Mustang version, they are both 10mm.

The only modification that needs to be made is to enlarge the mounting holes slightly to fit over the studs that are installed in my booster. You can see where I did that to the one on the right.

Thanks again for the advice....

 

 

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Oh,  Mywe627 asked a question that I did not answer about the Ford Explorer master cylinder.  I did look at one of those at the auto parts store, and it appeared to be larger than the one I had.  Also, it had an extra port on it, perhaps for ABS, or something.  

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Bob, it appears that you can swap the reservoirs, as the connections to the aluminum part have the same spacing.  But, I am not going to pull mine apart to check it.  If you want my 2000 Mustang master cylinder, you can have it for a bargain price....

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Ok. So, swapped the reservoirs and flipped over my proportioning valve so all the connections are on the drivers side.  Installed my brake pedal that I got from Master Power Brakes.  It uses the “dropped” eye brake pushrod that is typically on the ‘69s.  But they supply both.   Everything fit perfectly.  

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On 2/23/2018 at 1:57 PM, Vicfreg said:

  But, I am not going to pull mine apart to check it.  If you want my 2000 Mustang master cylinder, you can have it for a bargain price....

Thanks, but why would I want 2 with engine side ports? :)  I ordered the Ranger MC off Amazon yesterday.

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Not sure if you have thought about this and you probably have, but when you bleed the system its a good idea to replace the brake warning switch with a locking pin to prevent the piston in the distribution block from moving and blocking fluid flow. Something like this one.

https://westernchassisinc.com/Proportioning-Valve-Bleed-Tool/

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RPM..... right....  I  I was kidding I know have a collection of master cylinders too. Although I actually did need to swap the reservoir so I’m glad I didn’t return it 

unilex-  yeah thanks, that’s a good reminder. The master power brakes kit I have came with a plug that you use to insert into the proportioning valve to keep it from changing position when your bleeding the brakes 

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Continued mocking up my brake tubes with the steel brake lines.   Got them bent and installed the master cylinder.   I used the Ford Ranger master cylinder body, and the Mustang reservoir with my Master Power Brakes proportioning valve mounted underneath.   I am also going to use an in-line, pressure actuated brake light switch, so I routed those lines from the front brake line outlet.  

Looks like that arrangement will work nicely.  I will now re bend all of these lines in their final configuration, making sure they are not over bent, scratched, dented, etc, and mount my brass tee and brake light switch securely.  Then bench bleed the master cylinder, and call that part done.  I also need to hook up my rear brake line, but that is the easy one.

Took a brake (no pun intended.....) from the tube bending to assemble my adjustable motor mounts and take some measurements.  I have both the stock height and 1/2" drop, and after several iterations of measuring, decided I had at least an inch clearance from my big oil pan to the center link.  So, I am going with the 1/2" drop, as that will help me with my high rise intake/shaker hood fit up.  The picture of the engine bay shows the adjustable motor mount plates attached to the front crossmember support.  You can see the slotted hole that runs horizontally, that allows for the side to side adjustment of the engine.   The picture of the other mounting plates show the front to back slot and that adjustment.  What is missing in the pictures is the rear leaf spring poly bushings that go into the engine side assembly.  Those are on the way.....

This should also allow me to steer the engine clear of the Borgeson box, my big-ass C-6 transmission, and the shorty headers that want to hit everything...   Should be fun...

 

 

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I had a couple of reasons for going with the PWM approach:

  • I am running 2 – 12” cooling fans that draw at least 20 amps each.  Using relays to control the on-off for these is just not optimum, as the relay contacts take a beating, and there is EMF generated by the relay coil de-energization that needs to be mitigated.  I have a lot of electronics on board

  • I cannot use an insertion type temperature probe that is typically installed in the radiator.  My radiator fins are extremely tight, (I have a De-Witt direct fit aluminum radiator) and even the smallest probe will not fit.  I have no extra engine temperature ports due to the use of my VHX gauges, and the temperature probe for my EFI

  • I need to have the fan controls interact with the trinary safety switch on my Vintage Air system, which would require more relays.

  • I want to have a fail-safe cooling mode where I can manually turn the fans on to 100% if I need to without adding more relays

  • If I am driving and stop for gas, and the car is still hot, when I restart the car, I don’t want both fans to turn on full blast when I am cranking the car.

  • The PWM has the following advantages:

    • Direct measurement of radiator outlet temperature

    • Soft start of the fans

    • Continuously variable speed based on outlet temperature

    • A/C override with one 12v  input from the trinary safety switch

    • Fail safe with a simple switch to ground

    • Internally fused

    • Ability to adjust the temperature setpoint and vary coolant temperature in small increments (a few degrees)

    • Ability to remote mount the controller

    • 30 second fan run/cooldown after shutdown

    • Controller bypass during starting

    • No relays

I did buy the 100 amp model, only because it was a “no-buzz” version.  I will admit it is overkill, from an amperage standpoint.  Now there are models available that are lower amperage. I picked the Auto-Cool guy because of the industrial design, and the temperature probe.  At the time, the other suppliers did not offer a direct measurement option, only the radiator insert option.

I ran the controller on my engine test stand.  As advertised, as soon as my thermostat opened (190) the fans slow started and ramped up.   After the engine heated up, I adjusted the fan controller settings and I was able to move the coolant temperature up and down.    I also tested the A/C override and fail safe and it worked as advertised.

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Just a comment on your plan to use a pressure actuated brake light switch, to make the brake lights come on you will have to apply enough pressure to activate the brakes, but if you are like me and you are travelling slowly and you see someone closing rapidly from behind I like to rest my foot on the brake pedal just enough to activate the brake lights and let them know I am going slowly, you can't do this with a pressure activated switch.

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Hey Jet....good point..  I am going with the pressure actuated switch, but did leave a connector under the dash in case I need to go backwards to the old style switch.....

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Got my gas pedal installed.  Took a picture of the gas pedal spring installation, which is one of the mystery items that is not well detailed anywhere.

Also started on my tilt wheel re-assembly.   I will post a separate thread on that for others to follow in the tech forum.

 

 

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Got my backup steering column in for a trial fit to my Borgeson steering box.   It is really close, so I am fussing with final adjustments.  I may need to cut the stupid column locking actuator arm off the inner column tube, as it is really close to the rag joint bolts.  But, got a chance to try my Billet steering wheel, and I am pretty happy with the look.  

 

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I had to trim my tube quite a bit for it not to rub.  Make sure that rag joint fits the borgeson box really well. Mine came loose one day and trying to re tighten it sucked. The cheap bolt ended up stripping out so that's when I went to the universal joint. Made my steering better but man the noise coming up the column sucks

 

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Hey Byron. Thanks for the insights.  On my '68, it went right in with no issues.  On my '70, it has been a trial and error fit up.  I did buy the Borgeson Rag Joint, as the other one I had was a POS.  Theirs has a set screw with a locking nut.  After I get the fit-up right,  I may try out the Mustang Steve lower bearing set up, which is supposed to be able to be inserted into the lower column to hold the shaft in place.  We will see.  I have way too many hours involved in this already.   Thank goodness I used one of my spare steering columns and not my tilt column.  I guess I am going to say with my fixed column. I can't bring myself to cut a perfectly good 1970 tilt column, they are just too hard to find.

 

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Been a few weeks, but been busy with other things, now playing catch up with the car.   

Finally got my steering column squared away.  Had to cut about 3/4" off of the end of the outer tube. Then used the Mustang Steve end bearing sleeve kit to keep the end shaft centered.   I had to modify that also but it worked out.

Got all my brake plumbing done, bled the brakes.  Finished the install of my power steering lines in the drivers side fenderwell.  Did a last check of all my wiring/plumbing run in the fenderwells, and consider that done.  

Installed my front wheels.  Wow...brakes, steering, wheels...... !

Moving now to finish dis-assembly of my engine test stand, install the FiTech plumbing and wiring on my engine. Then, put the trans and converter on, and install the engine....

 

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