Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
KMD88

Mentorships and where to find them?

Recommended Posts

Hey everyone,

Have a bit of an odd question and I'm probably overthinking it. So, I've had my 69 Mach 1 for 3 years now. I love it, but when I first got it I didn't really have a place to work on it. So when getting it up and restored, I had to do it through a reputable mechanic or just let it sit. The goal of having this car was being able to learn about it and work on it myself, but I decided to get the car safe and drive-able. 

I now have a small garage and want to start doing some modifications (EFI being one at the top of my list), but I know I need someone to show me the ropes. I could watch a thousand YouTube videos (and I have), but someone has to look at my particular Mach 1, what's been done to it (before me and after) and really hold my hand through this process. Plus, I want to learn by doing. 

Has anyone ever looked for a mentor to help them learn about their car? I don't really know anyone locally, so I'm thinking of joining the local chapter of a mustang club here in Los Angeles. If anyone has any additional advice about how to learn about my car so I can start working on it myself, that would be great. You guys are the pros, so just thought I would ask in case there's more to consider. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was like you 8 years ago when I bought my 70 Torino.  I knew nothing and did not grow up around other guys who worked on their cars.  No one in my family worked on cars when growing up.  None of my current friends worked on cars.  Even with those disadvantages I learned how to restore my car.  I learned everything by obsessively stalking the forums and watching thousands of videos.  I did it on my own.  By myself.  

You said you want to learn by doing.  You are right.  That is the only way.  When most of these guys started working on cars they were just teenagers working on their car in the driveway and even at the curb.  You just have to start with something small.  Figure it out and build your knowledge little by little.  Unfortunately, it is very unlikely someone in a car club is going to take you under their wing and help you with your project.  They probably have their own project they need to work on.  I would just keep watching the videos and doing the research.  Good luck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Unfortunately, I found very few classics in my club, and even fewer people who actually work on their cars. I find that frustrating, because I like working on things, and talking to like minded people. If you don't have some natural mechanical ability, it will be very difficult. I have one son that doesn't know one end of a screwdriver from the other, but his younger brother will attempt anything. I figure I could do anything, but there are some things I just don't want to do. For instance, I think hog ring pliers would make my arthritis act-up, so unless I can fashion a pair with long handles, I'm not going to attempt upholstery. You will learn techniques as you go along, just by trial and error. You may need to do it over one or more times, but so what? You'll probably do it better than most shops- and believe me that is very true. Only one in four professionals are competent at what they do.

With help and guidance from a group of guys like we have here, you will get it done. These are are fairly simple machines, and its not rocket science. Much of it is unbolting one part and bolting on another. I had never welded until recently, so I bought a welder and through the use of videos, I practiced (and practiced)  (and practiced), and finally built a ramp to get one of my cars in the garage (its one of those plastic cars that we don't like to mention on this forum). The car is too low and the driveway too steep, but now I can drive it right in. 

If you think you can't do something, you're right. If you adopt an attitude that anything you mess-up can be fixed, it makes a world of difference. Just remember that nothing that anyone does is perfect. I tend to be a perfectionist and constantly have to remind myself when something is good enough.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome to the site.  Before converting to EFI you might try a basic tune up?  Plugs, points and condenser or an oil and filter change?  Get the Ford Shop Manuals for your car.  Start learning the names of parts and their functions.  Then try asking a few questions?  See how it goes.  Brian 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks guys. This is all really great advice. I prefer to be self-reliant and I was surprised, and also happy, that you all feel the same way. 

Brian Conway: Good starting point re: Plugs, points and condenser and oil change. Chances are, I'll start there. 

 

(P.S. Apologies for the delay. Had a bout of food poisoning I got over.)  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The best advice i can muster up is get a car you're not afraid to work on and learn on.  If your mustang is too nice, you can be intimidated by it.  Get yourself something more ugly or more basic so you aren't afraid to wrench on it.

 

From there, just start learning how each of the systems work.  Brakes, fuel delivery, power steering, cooling, spark/ignition, electrical/charging, etc.  Every part of the car has a purpose.  And once you understand the purpose, you can understand what happens when that part is broken or acting up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, potato said:

The best advice i can muster up is get a car you're not afraid to work on and learn on.  If your mustang is too nice, you can be intimidated by it.  Get yourself something more ugly or more basic so you aren't afraid to wrench on it.

 

From there, just start learning how each of the systems work.  Brakes, fuel delivery, power steering, cooling, spark/ignition, electrical/charging, etc.  Every part of the car has a purpose.  And once you understand the purpose, you can understand what happens when that part is broken or acting up.

Fair point, thanks potato. I've actually stayed away from starting any body work, etc. for this very reason :) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/27/2022 at 11:56 AM, KMD88 said:

Hey everyone,

Have a bit of an odd question and I'm probably overthinking it. So, I've had my 69 Mach 1 for 3 years now. I love it, but when I first got it I didn't really have a place to work on it. So when getting it up and restored, I had to do it through a reputable mechanic or just let it sit. The goal of having this car was being able to learn about it and work on it myself, but I decided to get the car safe and drive-able. 

I now have a small garage and want to start doing some modifications (EFI being one at the top of my list), but I know I need someone to show me the ropes. I could watch a thousand YouTube videos (and I have), but someone has to look at my particular Mach 1, what's been done to it (before me and after) and really hold my hand through this process. Plus, I want to learn by doing. 

Has anyone ever looked for a mentor to help them learn about their car? I don't really know anyone locally, so I'm thinking of joining the local chapter of a mustang club here in Los Angeles. If anyone has any additional advice about how to learn about my car so I can start working on it myself, that would be great. You guys are the pros, so just thought I would ask in case there's more to consider. 

If you are just going to cruise on sunny days, skip the EFI and stay with carb unless you are a good EFI tuner.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/8/2022 at 8:50 AM, Brian Conway said:

So what's under the hood?  How close to stock is the drive train? Brian

351 Windsor. Besides putting in a bigger radiator everything's pretty much stock there. Petronix ignition system added by previous owner. 

Via a local mechanic: Modified suspension (Bilstein front and rear shocks). Did the arning drop and added monte carlo bar, export brace and front sway bar. 

Those are the big changes at this point. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/8/2022 at 12:13 PM, aslanefe said:

If you are just going to cruise on sunny days, skip the EFI and stay with carb unless you are a good EFI tuner.

I've gone back and forth with doing EFI. I'm hoping to drive the car more regularly and, living in LA, I've heard having EFI helps when stuck in bumper-to-bumper traffic and cuts down on warm-up time, idling irregularities due to external circumstances (weather), etc.. I know these are small things, but over time it compounds. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
55 minutes ago, KMD88 said:

I've gone back and forth with doing EFI. I'm hoping to drive the car more regularly and, living in LA, I've heard having EFI helps when stuck in bumper-to-bumper traffic and cuts down on warm-up time, idling irregularities due to external circumstances (weather), etc.. I know these are small things, but over time it compounds. 

I drove my 70 Grande with Autolite 2100 for over 25 years in big city traffic, in winter with snow etc as daily driver; still drive it a few hundred miles every summer. Only thing I had to do that car in those years was to replace the accelarator pump once.  Have been driving my 69 Grande with Sniper EFI for over 2 years as daily driver in a small city where it snows every 4-5 years. Comparing these two cars, I do not see anything that can compound over time.  My second 70 Grande I am restoring now will stay carbureted.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, aslanefe said:

I drove my 70 Grande with Autolite 2100 for over 25 years in big city traffic, in winter with snow etc as daily driver; still drive it a few hundred miles every summer. Only thing I had to do that car in those years was to replace the accelarator pump once.  Have been driving my 69 Grande with Sniper EFI for over 2 years as daily driver in a small city where it snows every 4-5 years. Comparing these two cars, I do not see anything that can compound over time.  My second 70 Grande I am restoring now will stay carbureted.

Thanks for the examples. Definitely something to think about. I'm a ways away from it at this point with my current knowledge base, so I have time to think it over.

What motivated you to originally add EFI to the 69 Grande? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, KMD88 said:

Thanks for the examples. Definitely something to think about. I'm a ways away from it at this point with my current knowledge base, so I have time to think it over.

What motivated you to originally add EFI to the 69 Grande? 

The reason was, I wanted to see/experience the EFI on a classic daily driver. On my carbed cars, I have to press the gas pedal once or twice to activate the choke/prime the intake depending on how long the car sat, outside temp etc; with Sniper, I have to turn the key on, wait 2-3 seconds for Sniper to prime the intake and then start the car. That is the only difference, I can not feel any improvements but I have not dynoed the car before and after and never calculated the mpg.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/10/2022 at 3:03 AM, aslanefe said:

The reason was, I wanted to see/experience the EFI on a classic daily driver. On my carbed cars, I have to press the gas pedal once or twice to activate the choke/prime the intake depending on how long the car sat, outside temp etc; with Sniper, I have to turn the key on, wait 2-3 seconds for Sniper to prime the intake and then start the car. That is the only difference, I can not feel any improvements but I have not dynoed the car before and after and never calculated the mpg.

I see, interesting. Thanks for the info!

How was reliability with EFI? Did you ever experience any new issues after installing? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, KMD88 said:

I see, interesting. Thanks for the info!

How was reliability with EFI? Did you ever experience any new issues after installing? 

I installed Sniper 2300. Besides replacing mulfunctioning IAC and temp sensor and spending a lot of time trying to tune it, it is okay. I would say that carb is more reliable, no electric pump or other sensors etc to fail and leave you stranded. I can get a car with carb and points ignition going with a few basic tools, some wire, hose and duct tape and not have to wait for a tow truck, not with EFI.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...