Jump to content

Rich Ackermann

Members
  • Content Count

    292
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    21

Everything posted by Rich Ackermann

  1. If you are mounting your relays somewhere in the engine compartment, I would suggest using a relay box with fuse slots, or use weather proof relays. Here is what I did....
  2. For what it is worth, here is the 1" drop template I received from Global West. I wrote the measurements all over it, if you want to make your own. The instruction are simple... Bolt it thru you existing upper control arm shack tower holes and drill two 1/4" holes thru the 1/4" holes in the template below the factory holes.. Also attached below are the alignment instructions, if you are using Global West's upper and lower control arms, Strut rods and Eccentric lock-outs... 1967-1973 Mustang Plus 3 Upper Control Arms # MNR-733 (Sold as a Pair)Global West has engineered an upgraded upper control arm for 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, and 1973 Mustangs; the arm provides additional positive caster by moving the upper ball joint back towards the rear of the car. This particular kit is used for street and handling applications. (Global West also manufactures a control arm for drag racing / street.) The new Plus 3 Mustang arms are shipped assembled with billet cross shafts, Del-a-lum bushings and ball joints. The a-arms are black powder coated and the cross shafts are blue zinc (silver). Global West manufactures this product in its own facility here in San Bernardino CA. Tech Information: Caster With upgraded suspension and present tire technology, caster plays an important part for proper handling of the car. Caster does the following: provides straight line stability, has a self centering action on the front suspension, improves initial turn in during cornering and also resists pulling (right hand drift) caused by road crown. The Alignment Adjustment and Limitation: Caster on 1967-73 Mustangs is adjusted by moving the lower control arm forward via the strut rod. The strut rod is threaded at one end where the rubber bushings reside. By loosening and tightening the jam nuts you can pull the lower arm forward gaining more caster. This was not an option on 1967-1973 Mustangs. The real limitation on how much caster you can get is mainly based on the rim and tire combination you are planning on running. The larger sizes limit how far you can move the lower arm forward because the tire runs into the lower portion of the front fender when the wheel is turned. If this occurs, you will have to reduce caster, which is not the best answer. Now with Global West Plus 3 upper arms you will be able to get the caster you need! Global West Plus 3 upper arms have 3 degrees of positive caster built into them. This will eliminate the need to pull the lower arm so far forward in order to get the desired alignment. Coil Springs are stock height #: s-27 performance street with 640 pounds per inch. Global West has engineered an upgraded upper control arm for 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, and 1973 Mustangs; the arm provides additional positive caster by moving the upper ball joint back towards the rear of the car. This particular kit is used for street and handling applications. (Global West also manufactures a control arm for drag racing / street.) The new Plus 3 Mustang arms are shipped assembled with billet cross shafts, Del-a-lum bushings and ball joints. The a-arms are black powder coated and the cross shafts are blue zinc (silver). Global West manufactures this product in its own facility here in San Bernardino CA. Tech Information: Caster With upgraded suspension and present tire technology, caster plays an important part for proper handling of the car. Caster does the following: provides straight line stability, has a self centering action on the front suspension, improves initial turn in during cornering and also resists pulling (right hand drift) caused by road crown. The Alignment Adjustment and Limitation: Caster on 1967-73 Mustangs is adjusted by moving the lower control arm forward via the strut rod. The strut rod is threaded at one end where the rubber bushings reside. By loosening and tightening the jam nuts you can pull the lower arm forward gaining more caster. This was not an option on 1967-1973 Mustangs. The real limitation on how much caster you can get is mainly based on the rim and tire combination you are planning on running. The larger sizes limit how far you can move the lower arm forward because the tire runs into the lower portion of the front fender when the wheel is turned. If this occurs, you will have to reduce caster, which is not the best answer. Now with Global West Plus 3 upper arms you will be able to get the caster you need! Global West Plus 3 upper arms have 3 degrees of positive caster built into them. This will eliminate the need to pull the lower arm so far forward in order to get the desired alignment. Note: When using Plus 3 arms, there is now a right and left upper control arm. The original control arms (factory or first generation Global West Negative Roll control arms) are universal. 1966-1967-1968-1969-1970-1971-1972-1973-mustang-cougar-fairlane-falcon-ranchero-mustang-eccentric-loc-out-kit-instructions-loc-2.pdf
  3. I remember looking at that on the Global West website. The upper control arm are has no spring perch, so the strut can just pass thru it. Nice setup.
  4. Vicfreg, Does or will your TCP panhard bar clear stock 2 1/2" dual exhaust? Any welding needed? Thanks, Rich
  5. Vicfreg, Very nice setup. I thought about going with a coil over, but in the end chose not to. Looking at yours I wonder if I made the right decision.
  6. The Car show and cruise season ends here by November and does not start again until April. July 1987... I remember it well. I was in the midst of moving into a new home with two kids and a expecting wife. Anyway, I believe you are heading into the spring season there in Australia. Enjoy the warmer weather! Hopefully Covid does not prevent you from getting the mustang out on a road trip or two! Regards,
  7. A bit warmer on average than New York City, but not that much different. Delaware like other mid Atlantic east coast states, the seasons are a little warmer as you go south and cooler as you go north. In Delaware summers in July thru late Sept are 30 to 35 Celsius and winters between December and March are between -5 and 4 Celsius. We usually have a less than a foot of snow, but some years more and others hardly any. September thru October is the best time of year for temp and weather in DE. Spring starts in April. So there you have it.
  8. Hey thanks man. After all the hard work, I am looking forward to getting her out in public and showing her off a little.
  9. Thanks!. Yes, I can't wait to get out and about, and to a few car shows and show her off.
  10. Well, took her out for a drive. First time she move3d under her own power since 1983, when the P.O parked it. My wife snapped a few pics of it as I left the drive for a quick trip around the block...Still no windshield, but nothing too strenuous. Still needs and alignment and some muffler work and a DMV inspection.... After I parked it in the driveway, I came out later to put her in the garage and saw her illuminated under the evening sky and had to snap one more picture... Just love that Calypso Coral color!
  11. Those two Stangs look Fantastic! Nice work! What an experience for you and your boys!
  12. On my 70 MAch 1 I installed Global West Tubular Upper upper and lower control arms and their adjustable strut rods. Also used their Eccentric Loc-Outs. The kit provided a 1" drop steel template for drilling the lower upper control arm pivot holes. I installed Global West Coil Springs (#: s-27), which are stock height performance street with 640 pounds per inch. I welded in some of the BOSS track Mods... the Shock Tower reinforcements plates and the crossmember lower control arm eccentric anchor plates (I chose to use Global West Eccentric Loc-Outs instead). I also converted my manual steering to a CPP GM style power steering setup and swapped my front spindles and drum brakes to stronger Granada front spindles, and calipers with slotted/drilled rotors. I just finished the restoration, and have had limited opportunity to drive the car, but so far so good. Here is the Global West Suspension product description... https://www.globalwest.net/mustang-1967-1968-1969-1970-tubular-arms-strut-rods-front-suspension-global-west.html 1967-1973 Mustang Plus 3 Upper Control Arms # MNR-733 (Sold as a Pair)Global West has engineered an upgraded upper control arm for 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, and 1973 Mustangs; the arm provides additional positive caster by moving the upper ball joint back towards the rear of the car. This particular kit is used for street and handling applications. (Global West also manufactures a control arm for drag racing / street.) The new Plus 3 Mustang arms are shipped assembled with billet cross shafts, Del-a-lum bushings and ball joints. The a-arms are black powder coated and the cross shafts are blue zinc (silver). Global West manufactures this product in its own facility here in San Bernardino CA. Tech Information: Caster With upgraded suspension and present tire technology, caster plays an important part for proper handling of the car. Caster does the following: provides straight line stability, has a self centering action on the front suspension, improves initial turn in during cornering and also resists pulling (right hand drift) caused by road crown. The Alignment Adjustment and Limitation: Caster on 1967-73 Mustangs is adjusted by moving the lower control arm forward via the strut rod. The strut rod is threaded at one end where the rubber bushings reside. By loosening and tightening the jam nuts you can pull the lower arm forward gaining more caster. This was not an option on 1967-1973 Mustangs. The real limitation on how much caster you can get is mainly based on the rim and tire combination you are planning on running. The larger sizes limit how far you can move the lower arm forward because the tire runs into the lower portion of the front fender when the wheel is turned. If this occurs, you will have to reduce caster, which is not the best answer. Now with Global West Plus 3 upper arms you will be able to get the caster you need!
  13. Hi Rich, I replaced all of the brake lines. Don't use 50 year old lines with your new brake system. I bought the 1970 Mustang kit from Inline Tube. All the lines will need some modification. I prefer to use Stainless Steel. but it is much harder to work with...hard to bend, and if you need to trim them, it is impossible to flare the ends with hand tools. So I would recommend using Steel lines. The line from the rear to the Proportioning valve will need some bending to line up, as will the two front lines. The lines from the valve to the master cylinder will need to be bent. My conversion kit cam with rubber lines to connect the two rear lines to the rear disc caliper, but I chose to go all hardline instead. The rear lines after the junction "T" on the axle will need to be trimmed and bent to line up with eh rear calipers. The critical part for me was finding the Banjo to 3/8" female inverted flare to connect the existing hardline fitting to the rear caliper. My front Granada disc brake assembly came with the flex lines. I needed to add an adapter to connect the hardline fitting to the flex tube. I also need to install a mounting bracket to secure the hard line and flex tube to the frame. Finding all the right fitting adapters took a lot of time a searching and some trial and error. If you have access to a hydraulic flaring tool and know someone who can help you make the tubes with the right flares and fittings, then that may be a good route to take. Finally, you will need to make some mods to the parking brake cable ends to adapt it to the rear brake calipers. Also you will need a GM Proportioning valve Brake Warning light plug. Our Mustang have two wire plugs and the GM plug is one wire. Just twist the two wires from you Ford harness together and connect it to the GM one wire. Let me know if I can provide anymore info.
  14. I like the black carpet, dash, console, and rear fold down. I think those parts in black contrast nicely against the red seats. Thanks
  15. Randy, I was thinking of a Manual Reset Low Profile ATC Circuit Breaker. Essentially an ATC type fuse that can be reset. An auto reset breaker would be pointless. Thanks
  16. Randy, Yes, I am not sure what year Mustang the Fusible link wire is from. I know its not from my 70 Mustang. Any reason not to use a manual reset breaker instead of a Fusible link? Does your point about protection from a massive short while the car is parked work with a Breaker as well? I would think so. How many sizes smaller is best? or example use a 14AWG fusible link wire with a 10 AWG wire or 12AWG fusible link wire with a 10 AWG? Thanks as always for your help. Rich
  17. That's correct the alternator is considered and hybrid front Ford and rear GM to accommodate the larger internals needed for the 140amp. I understand and will do 1, 2, and 3. Thanks so much! Question for you and Randy, Any reason not to use a manual reset breaker instead of a Fusible link?
  18. Here is a picture of a portion of the alternator wire harness I removed when converting to the 140amp Tuff Stuff Alternator. The 1970 wiring diagram says Black wire 38 and black/yellow accessory 37 wire are 10 Gauge. Yellow 21 Ignition switch Accessory is 12 gauge. Although missing from my harness the 38A fusible link pigtail to the battery side of the solenoid branched at the connection of wires 38 and 37. I cannot confirm what year the wire below is from, but here is a picture of the end of 38 and Fusible Link 38A. You can see the fusible link on wire 38A which is the lead to the battery side of the solenoid. It says 14 G.A and Black wire 38 is 10 gauge to the 2 pin plug is missing on the end. This wire is setup differently with the yellow wire 152 junction in the middle rather than at the plug as it is on my 1970 wire.
  19. I look forward reading your paper thoroughly. I will call them and get clarity on term A wire as well. Anyway, I thank you very much for taking the time to answer my questions in an effort to sort this out. Regards, Rich
  20. Yes. The black wire #38 10 AWG which originally connected to the stock Alternator and thru a 2 pin plug to the Battery side of the regulator and also to the #37 Black/Yellow Accessory wire, now goes directly from the terminal block to the #37 Black/Yellow Accessory wire. The new 6 AWG wire goes from the T. S. Alternator directly to the terminal block. The path according to Ford #904 red/green wire goes from the I term on the regulator to the other pin in the 2 pin plug along with Black wire #38 then to the gauge cluster plug where it splits and one wire goes to the Alt warning lamp and the other goes to the large pin on the ignition switch plug, where it is joined with The Black/Green #297 wire. I have changed nothing with wire #904, and other than removing #38 wire from the battery side of the Solenoid and relocating the 10 AWG #38 wire from the original Ford alternator to the terminal block, where it now meets up with the new 6 AWG wire from the T. S. alternator.
  21. When I talked to the tech at Tuff Stuff, I told them that I was using the stock harness and regulator plug. My focus was on terminal "I" and the warning light on. The Tech told me to disconnect "I", which bring us full circle and my reason for this post. I am uncomfortable with having the I (ignition) wire (#904 Green/Red Stripe) from the regulator. disconnected. Ford put it there for a reason. I would prefer to have the Warning Light working as it was intended, but I would prefer to get confirmation that there is no harm with disconnecting it. I did ask the Tech about fusing the wire to the Alternator. He said and I quote "Don't waste your money fusing it"
  22. Your point about the inadequate wire size is an excellent one, and was something I realized from the beginning, so with the new Alternator I ran a 6 AWG wire (which is what Tuff Stuff recommended) to a Terminal Block I installed. I have a 4 AWG wire from the terminal Block to the battery post. The factory black wire and the 904 Green/Red Stripe in the factory harness two pin plug now go to the battery post as well. The rest of the factory harness to the regulator is the same as it was. I also have a 10 AWG wire from the Alternator case to Chassis/Block ground. I question Tuff Stuff as to why the ground does not need to be 6 AWG like the positive wire, and they said the Alternator case is also grounded thru the mounting brackets to the block. Finally my Starter and Sub amp come directly off the battery terminal and are both 4 AWG. The Stater has a secondary 8 AWG wire from the Solenoid and the Sednoid has a 6 AWG wire to the battery post. Step #7 I ran 6 AWG wire from the Alternator to a Terminal Block and a 4 AWG wire from the terminal block to the battery post. All that said, I think I have made sure that all my electrical wire size is sufficient. I just spent the past hour drawing up an electrical diagram. I am no artist but I think I have clearly depicted what I have with the wire sizes.
  23. Hi Randy and other Ford wiring Experts, I installed a Tuff Stuff 140 amp Ford 1G Hybrid Alternator and a Tuff Stuff electronic Regulator in my 70 Mach 1 with a factory tachometer. I modified the stock wire harness according to the Tuff Stuff instructions (see below). I am using the factory wire harness from the regulator. Regulator Terminals (I = Ignition (#904 Green/Red Stripe) to Alternator Warning Lamp and Ignition Switch (where #904 also connects to #297 Black/Green Stripe) as shown in the Ford Charging/Prove-out wiring diagram. A = Battery (#152 Yellow) to Tuff Stuff Alternator Red wire S = Stator (#4 White/Black Stripe) to Tuff Stuff Alternator Yellow wire F = Field (#35 Orange) to Tuff Stuff Alternator Green wire The Alternator is running and charging great...no operational issue there. My issue is the Alternator light stays on and will not turn off. I called Tuff Stuff Tech and they told me I did not need to connect the I (ignition) wire (#904 Green/Red Stripe) from the regulator. I disconnected the I (ignition) wire (#904 Green/Red Stripe) and started the car everything appears to be working normally with this wire disconnected and the Alternator Warning Lamp is off. I am uncomfortable with having the I (ignition) wire (#904 Green/Red Stripe) from the regulator. disconnected as Ford put it there for a reason. Since other wires (#297 connects to the Ignition Switch and #640 connects to the other terminal on the Alternator warning lamp)) in the Ford harness are connected. Finally the Warning Lamp is now disabled. Fortunately I have a Volt Meter gauge as well, so I can live without the warning light. Does anyone who understand how the Warning Lamp work as Ford intended it to see a problem with disconnecting (I = Ignition (#904 Green/Red Stripe) from the Regulator? For my own edification, how does the Regulator and Alternator Warning Lamp circuit actually work to cause the Lamp to light? Thanks, Rich
×
×
  • Create New...