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capemustang

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About capemustang

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  1. I received an Altec Lansing Boomjacket (portable Bluetooth waterproof speaker) for Christmas one year. I made a bracket to hang it underneath the glove box. The bracket is not permanently mounted to the car or the speaker. This allows me to remove the speaker to recharge the battery, as needed. Btw, the charge lasts quite a while. The sounds is amazing and can be very loud, if desired. It doesn’t look bad in the car-it blends in. It is not the perfect sound system as compared to installing new speakers but it is perfect for our use.
  2. I believe you are correct that you don't need a relay with stock lights. I should have been more clear in my earlier post regarding the need for a relay. I decided to upgrade my headlights (4) from stock to halogens (Hella H1 and Koito). Because of the upgrade, it was strongly recommended that I install relays. Other friends (1967 and 1968 Mustangs) had upgraded their headlights to halogens and did not install relays. They experienced what KMD88 described in his earlier post - the lights cutting out and then later coming back on again. I do agree with barnett468 that you should check for bad/worn parts or loose connections. I am new to this and could be completely wrong about the relays. I hope you figure out what it is and don't have a repeat. Not fun going dark unexpectedly while going down the highway.
  3. I am considering having some body work (it’s never some!) done on my car as well as upgrade to power steering. Does anyone have some advice on restoration shops they prefer and have good experiences with in the Houston area? Thank you in advance. Mine is a 69 convertible 302 3 speed manual.
  4. As RPM said, you need a relay. I upgraded the lights to halogen on my 69 and needed to install two relays. The older wiring harnesses are not able to handle newer headlights which is why they cut out. I wish I could explain it better. I suggest taking a look at Daniel stern lighting.co m. He explains it so much better than I ever could. Also, vintage mustang forum has some great threads that discuss why the headlamps cut out, the need for relays, and provide solutions.
  5. Thank you. That's good to know about the dual friction and not needing it. I will look into the diaphragm clutch. I am learning on the go about clutches! Thank you for your help. Thank you, that's good to know about the original vs repo linkage pats. My clutch has always been a bit stiff so I wonder if my pressure plate that is a little different. Thank you for the info about a the two brands. Thank you for your help.
  6. I have been shopping for parts to fix up my clutch linkage. I have found a few NOS clutch forks, a clutch equalizer bar mount (engine side), and a zbar (equalizer bar). Should I put in NOS when I can find them or does it really matter? The rest of the parts will be reproductions. Also, what do you all think of the Centerforce dual friction clutch? Thank you in advance for your help. The car is a 69 convertible with a 302 manual 3 transmission. No AC or power steering.
  7. I have been shopping for parts to fix up my clutch linkage. I have found a few NOS clutch forks, a clutch equalizer bar mount (engine side), and a zbar (equalizer bar). Should I put in NOS when I can find them or does it really matter? The rest of the parts will be reproductions. Also, what do you all think of the Centerforce dual friction clutch? Thank you in advance for your help. The car is a 69 convertible with a 302 manual 3 transmission. No AC or power steering.
  8. I believe you are correct that the hole was worn in the center of the clutch fork. I am attaching a few photos of the clutch fork, as requested. They are not the best since I didn't have the car jacked up high enough. Also, I haven't removed the clutch fork yet and the dust cover is in the way. It almost appears as if they welded another nut on the clutch fork due to the octagonal shape. The welded nut on the lower clutch rod appears to fit into the fork perfectly (until it snapped!). I believe that because the clutch fork was fitted with the nut and also due to the equalizer bar (zbar) bushings being worn out contributed to the rod snapping.
  9. Thank you. Yes, I was trying to refer to the clutch pivot fork ball. I am very new to this, as I am sure you can tell! As you and others have suggested, I will be rebuilding the clutch linkage to the pedal, including the zbar (equalizer bar) bushings, and related parts. I am thinking that I will also replace the clutch while it's apart. I really appreciate every' help with advice and suggestions.
  10. Thank you, that’s a good tip. I took photos to the mechanic. He said that the clutch fork appears to be damaged/worn. Possibly from age/usage and he thinks that is why the nut was welded in the tip of the lower clutch rod. We are going to replace the fork, but he also wanted to replace the pivot ball. I can’t seem to find any for the 1969 . I can find many for other years and they are called a different names-clutch fork pivot ball or clutch fork stud . In a zbar/equalizer bar kit they have a pivot included. Is this what he might be referring to? I am attaching photos of that pivot as well as a photo of my fork.
  11. Thank you very much, I will do as you suggest. The cotter pin washer is missing-I will get one put in. As it was, the original cotter pin snapped (rusted) when I was pulling it out. Thank you very much for your help.
  12. Thank you, Thank you. I think you are correct. I was reading on a couple forums that When installing an adjustable lower clutch rod that you are not supposed to have the nuts straddle the pivot block. Something about it may cause it to snap. Mine original was installed that way. Is that correct? Also, there is a “potato chip” shaped washer between the pivot block and bar that is very old and allows more play-what would be its name and where might I find a replacement?
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