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1969_Mach1

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  1. Like
    1969_Mach1 got a reaction from RPM in Chasing a Vibration - Flex Plate?   
    I haven't had a lot of experience chasing down issues like you are having.  But in my experiences these are items that have contributed to it.  These might not all apply to your issue.
    -  Out of balance wheels or driveline.
    -  Motor mounts and/or trans mount.  This happens more often than you'd expect for odd vibration issues.  These are usually inexpensive and sometimes worth replacing if there is no other obvious cause.
    -  Trans tailshaft bushing worn out.
    -  Universal joints.
    -  Bad tire(s).  More common with road noise than vibration issues.
    -  Bent rear axle(s) or wheel(s) (uncommon).
    I'm not saying rule out the driveline angle.  But unless you changed something in the suspension or drivetrain, I wouldn't think that would be off.
  2. Like
    1969_Mach1 reacted to Mach1 Driver in Next Generation Mustang Lovers   
    For some strange reason the millennials consider cars to be appliances. My 18 year old grandson is a good example. His dad bought him a car and it sat for 6 months waiting for him to get a job to support it. He didn't know how to open the hood or where to put the oil and water. Much, much different than my generation. I blame it on his mother diluting the hot rod gene.
  3. Like
    1969_Mach1 got a reaction from ralt962 in Key off battery drain   
    For odd battery drains, after checking the obvious items like something turned on.  The first go to place is the alternator.  If two or more diodes short in the rectifier bridged, the alternator will drain the battery with the key off.  The alternator will still operate but the maximum amperage output will be a little low.  So if there is a drain using gordonr's method with a multimeter, disconnect the alternator and see if that has any affect.
    If you don't have a multimeter, on older cars like these you can use a test light.  Disconnect the positive battery cable, clip the lead to the positive battery post and touch the positive battery cable end with the other end.  If the light glows, even dim, there is too much current flow and will drain the battery.
  4. Like
    1969_Mach1 got a reaction from mwye0627 in Lost Spark   
    Not much you can do to protect an ignition module from heat if it's mounted inside or on the distributor.  It's an unfortunate drawback of that type of setup.  In the mid 1990's Ford moved ignition modules from the distributor to the inner fender panel and attached them to large aluminum heat sinks to help cooling.  I would still follow gordonr's testing to be certain the wiring is all okay.
  5. Like
    1969_Mach1 got a reaction from mwye0627 in Lost Spark   
    I'd definitely try to follow the suggestions from gordonr.  I will add, I've seen a lot of iginition modules or pick-ups fail intermittently from heat.  For ignition modules, more often when they are mounted on or inside the distributor.  Just saying, I wouldn't rule out those items.
    If you're concerned with heat to the ignition coil, move it to an inner fender panel and make up a longer coil wire.  Kind of an old school way of installing ignition coils.  I've seen ignition coils fail.  But not nearly as many as ignition modules.
  6. Like
    1969_Mach1 reacted to Midlife in Lost Spark   
    Sure sounds like a bad coil to me.
  7. Like
    1969_Mach1 got a reaction from mwye0627 in Lost Spark   
    I realized the OP has a Ready-To-Run distributor.  I don't know how much tech info MSD has to diagnose those.  They have resistance specs for magnetic pick-ups.  So that can be checked.  Coils rarely fail but are easily checked.  Like others mentioned, make sure the rotor is rotating.  Also when checking for spark test it a the coil wire to the distributor as well.  It's very rare, but I have seen a rotor crack and the electrical current from the coil goes directly to ground through the cracked rotor.
  8. Like
    1969_Mach1 got a reaction from mwye0627 in Lost Spark   
    Here is some diagnostic info from MSD.  I had to use it once.  Backed my car out of the garage.  Then it wouldn't restart to pull it back in.  I had a no spark condition.  In that case it was the magnetic pick-up inside the dist.
    https://www.msdperformance.com/support/troubleshooting_techniques/
  9. Like
    1969_Mach1 reacted to mwye0627 in Roller rocker installation and pushrod measurement   
    I re-read 1969_Mach1's post a few times, and while he did refer to the Inverted Flank camshaft lobe, (that's what we used to call them), I seen absolutely NO instance where he inferred that Inverted Radius cams would be the "best one for all builds etc."   He only stated that he had read interesting tech articles and they might be worth reading for someone who wanted further information...
    In order to have "Shamelessly Plagiarized" from whatever source, his written text would have to be Verbatim to the source you specified, which it most certainly is not....
    Many, in fact, Most people are not familiar with the YellowBullet.com website as it is tailored to a pretty specific audience. The two predominant groups that are drawn to YellowBullet are either Drag Racers, as it has a lot of different sections for various classes and venues.  The other group would be the "Pissers and Moaners", as it's first listed forum is "Trash or Be Trashed, where the Weak are Killed and Eaten"...   There are also quite a few political dissidents who regularly air their grievances...
    There  is a LOT of information available on YellowBullet, but nearly nothing I would consider Gospel...   and yes as a Long Time Drag Racer, I have been a member on YellowBullet for many years!  But as with MOST forums, the information presented is typically Opinions Only and should be regarded as such.
    As to the rest of your "Dissertation" on inverted radius roller cams, the vast majority of your rant is totally unnecessary to the typical classic car and muscle car hobbyist that frequent this forum.   I do understand much of your information since we ran a few different Inverted Flank roller cams which were all custom grinds specified by our engine builder, Ex NHRA Pro Stock racer and engine builder Sam Gianino back in the early 1990's. They were not nearly as aggressive as they could have been at that time, since the primary objective of the inverted flank lobe at that time was to increase the acceleration and velocity of the valve event to allow more "Area Under the Curve" for increased air flow.   Since we were not Billionaires we requested a slightly milder profile to save money due to valve spring attrition.   Again, this was before the advent and more widespread use of the SpinTron device which ultimately demonstrated the damage created by such camshaft profiles at high lift and RPM.
    As you constantly speak down with a condescending tone to anyone with an alternative opinion to your own, please try to remember that MOST members simply cannot  comprehend the engineering aspects of most active components within an Internal Combustion Engine, and instead of your diatribes being informative in a useful manner they typically come across as self serving babble with the sole purpose of stroking your own ego...
    As many wise men have said, think before speaking.
  10. Like
    1969_Mach1 reacted to gordonr in Lost Spark   
    " After a recent incident of a dancing tach, I decided to check all 3 original grounds and added a couple more.  I added a new ground from the back of the intake manifold to the firewall as well as firewall to frame."
    A few things are going on here . Besides the ground providing  a  path for the ignition coil to saturate  then release  the high voltage  it is the  power "on" for the module itself to operate.  As with the conversation around the pertronics and bypassing the resistance wire because of low voltage issue  hurting the module,  a poor ground can have the same effect.  Testing electrics is testing for a difference of potential . For example  using your voltmeter on "volts DC" add attaching one lead to the negative battery terminal and the other to where your module ground was bolted. Measuring a ground point to another ground point will measure a difference  of "0" on your meter or "no difference" in a perfect circuit when cranking or running.  In your case it wont be. I would be checking your 4 gauge engine ground as it also supplies the path for your alternators charging system. The acceptable spec with engine  running with all your accessories on is .5 volts or less across your main ground. Your chassis ground can be measured the same way by moving your lead of the intake to a chassis point. Your goal is as close to 0 volts as possible as its responsible  for all the accessories on your car. 
  11. Like
    1969_Mach1 got a reaction from Shep69 in Lost Spark   
    Here is some diagnostic info from MSD.  I had to use it once.  Backed my car out of the garage.  Then it wouldn't restart to pull it back in.  I had a no spark condition.  In that case it was the magnetic pick-up inside the dist.
    https://www.msdperformance.com/support/troubleshooting_techniques/
  12. Like
    1969_Mach1 got a reaction from mwye0627 in Roller rocker installation and pushrod measurement   
    My 2 cents.  If this is still the cam being considered, Lunati Part Number: 20350710 Previous Part Number: 61010,  I'd think in a 351W it will have a fairly smooth idle.  Good low end power.  Maybe the lopey idle is not a concern anymore.  Which is fine.  A cam the creates a lopey idle is generally designed for upper RPM power.
    Some say the Ford Racing letter cams are old technology.  They kind of are because they are straight pattern cams.  They have assymetric lobes, but straight patterns.  According to Ford Racing Tech they are selected because they are fairly easy on valve train parts and for cars that are street driven regularly.  Some motors are fine with straight pattern cams.  I'm not saying one is best for your application.  Isky cams has tech articles on this topic and on "inverse radius" cams which I think (not 100% sure) is the category of the Comp Xtreme series and the Lunati Voodoo series are.  If anything, these are interesting tech articles.  Might be worth reading.  If anything, just to gain some knowledge on the topic. 
  13. Confused
    1969_Mach1 got a reaction from Garthjat in Shocks   
    Anybody use the Scott Drake brand labeled shocks?  Are they simply KYB Gas-A-Justs that are relabeled for Scott Drake?  They look a little different than the KYB shocks.  Are they a high pressure gas shock like the KYB Gas-A-Justs?  There is very little info out there for these shocks.  Thanks in advance for any info.
     
    https://www.summitracing.com/parts/sdk-c5zz18124hp/overview/year/1969/make/ford/model/mustang
  14. Haha
    1969_Mach1 got a reaction from Anna.slinbut in Shocks   
    Depends on how the car is used and your budget.  In many cases $40 per shock is okay.
  15. Haha
    1969_Mach1 got a reaction from novikkromherg6688 in Shocks   
    Anybody use the Scott Drake brand labeled shocks?  Are they simply KYB Gas-A-Justs that are relabeled for Scott Drake?  They look a little different than the KYB shocks.  Are they a high pressure gas shock like the KYB Gas-A-Justs?  There is very little info out there for these shocks.  Thanks in advance for any info.
     
    https://www.summitracing.com/parts/sdk-c5zz18124hp/overview/year/1969/make/ford/model/mustang
  16. Thanks
    1969_Mach1 got a reaction from Johns Summer of 69 in Suspension for the every day driver   
    For the 1969 Mustang, if I understand the OP wants a softer ride.  First thing would be replace the 18" wheels with 15" wheels and a 60 or 65 series tires.  As far as feeling unstable "(squirrelly)" at highway speeds, it could be as simple as not enough positive caster in the front wheel alignment.  Beyond that, if the suspension and steering components are in good condition, I'd look closely at the power steering control valve and/or the steering box.
  17. Like
    1969_Mach1 reacted to mwye0627 in Roller rocker installation and pushrod measurement   
    Sorry Barnett, but I too have been doing this stuff for a very long time...    In fact I was ASE certified Master back in 1974  back when it was still called NIASE, the National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence.
    Other than being a tech, I am also a degreed engineer with 20+ years employed as both a Mechanical Design and Electronics Design Engineer.  To add to that, I worked as a crew chief for various drag racing teams since 1983 working on everything from 9 second super gas cars to 5.9 second 237 MPH Pro Mod cars.
    Getting back to the issue at hand, I would NEVER run a rocker arm or pushrod combination that would create a valve tip pattern biased to the inboard or outboard side of the valve.  Such an offset would undoubtedly place a unnecessary side load on the valve and valve guide leading to increased and accelerated wear. The best possible rocker tip to valve tip orientation will produce as straight of a perfect up and down valve travel as possible without undue side loads. 
     If you really want to learn more about the dynamics of valve motion do some research and watch some stop motion video footage of engines and valve trains being tested on a SpinTron device...  It was a very enlightening experience for me and really opened my eyes to the dynamics of our own racing programs...   Just imagine valve lifts of 1.065" at 8600 rpm...   If your set-up is off just a little, the damage can cost tens of thousands of dollars...   No room for error...
    Now, If you can show me Proof that your opinion is Truly the desired result for All situations, I am more than willing to be enlightened by differing views!
  18. Like
    1969_Mach1 got a reaction from SM69Mach in Huge loss for the family   
    Terribly sorry for your loss.  7- years old is too young.  That is a very difficult heart breaking situation.  Large dogs are great companions and it sometimes seems they bond with their families more so than small dogs.  I've been there 4 times with Golden Retrievers.  Three when they were young, 8 and 9 years old due to cancer.  But, I keep getting another one.  You never forget them but the pain will go away with time.
  19. Like
    1969_Mach1 got a reaction from Bob & Sue in Brakes extremely sensitive   
    The only time I have seen an over sensitive brake pedal was when something was wrong with the brake booster.  First, is it the correct booster?  1969 was the year Ford switched from Midland to Bendix.  Some early 1969's still got the Midland booster.  They do interchange without any modifications.  From what I understand, the Midland booster provides greater power assist but was unreliable compared to the Bendix booster.
    *** Before you condemn the booster, follow Mach1Rider's and Jett 445's suggestion and make certain everything is correct. 
  20. Like
    1969_Mach1 got a reaction from TheRktmn in Brakes extremely sensitive   
    The only time I have seen an over sensitive brake pedal was when something was wrong with the brake booster.  First, is it the correct booster?  1969 was the year Ford switched from Midland to Bendix.  Some early 1969's still got the Midland booster.  They do interchange without any modifications.  From what I understand, the Midland booster provides greater power assist but was unreliable compared to the Bendix booster.
    *** Before you condemn the booster, follow Mach1Rider's and Jett 445's suggestion and make certain everything is correct. 
  21. Like
    1969_Mach1 got a reaction from Ridge Runner in 428 top loader   
    Fairly certain you can swap out the input shaft but will also need a new front bearing retainer.  You will need to drop the counter shaft  to do the job.  A dummy counter shaft will hold the counter shaft rollers in place but will not hold the counter shaft thrust washers in place.  When I made a dummy shaft I used a hollow tube.  I can dig it out and measure it if you need that info.  I put a piece of welding rod longer than the length of the case through the center of the hollow dummy shaft tube.  The hollow tube dummy shaft held the rollers in place.  And the welding rod through the center of the hollow tube stopped the thrust washers from sliding completely out of place and let the counter shaft drop far enough. 
    There are some rollers that will likely fall out of the input shaft when it is removed.  Get yourself some transmission assembly grease to hold the rollers in place inside the input shaft during installation.  The trans assembly grease will melt easily and mix into the oil.  Many people use chassis or wheel bearing grease and it will not melt and mix into the oil very well.
    The big block and small block main shaft and tail shaft housings are different as well.  I don't know about the shifter mount locations.  But you will need a drive shaft yoke to fit it.
    If you are getting new parts, the easiest but sometimes not the cheapest place to get all the parts you need is David Kee Toploaders, like barnett468 mentioned.  I purchased a lot of parts from him when I built mine.  He will answer any questions you have.  Just not to easy to get on the phone.
  22. Like
    1969_Mach1 got a reaction from Sean D in Engine Installation - headers & transmission   
    When I tried to install an RPM Air Gap on my 69 Mach 1 with a 351W.  When using a carb with a choke tower I could not get the air cleaner lid low enough.  The air cleaner lid was contacting the choke tower and/or choke plate before I could get enough hood clearance.
    I've removed the choke tower from Holley carbs in the past for hood clearance reasons.  One benefit of going that route is you can leave the choke mechanism on the side of the carb and still have fast idle when cold.  Many Holley carbs run rich enough so that the choke tower and choke plate are not needed.
    The GM RPM Air Gap is the same height as the Performer RPM.  It would have been nice if Edelbrock put that same effort into the Ford RPM Air Gap.
  23. Like
    1969_Mach1 got a reaction from RPM in Mounting Rear Speakers in a 69 Fastback   
    I removed and saved the original trap door from mine and installed one of those plastic repro trap doors that have the pods for two 6X9 speakers.  I installed two Blaupunkt 6x9 speakers in it.  Being plastic it's not as nice as the original trap door.  But, it still looks nice and neat and is much better than cutting up an original trap door.
  24. Thanks
    1969_Mach1 got a reaction from Sean D in 351w drivers side lower outlet radiator hose   
    My 1969 351W still has the passenger side lower radiator hose setup.  Knowing what I do now, I kind of wish I converted it to a drivers side lower radiator hose setup when I built it.
  25. Thanks
    1969_Mach1 got a reaction from Sean D in 351w drivers side lower outlet radiator hose   
    If the hose specifies with A/C it would be for a 24" radiator.
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