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JayEstes

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  1. Like
    JayEstes got a reaction from Flanders in I started smoking   
    Light smoke might also mean leaking head gasket.  I'd double check oil and coolant to be sure the coolant isn't low, and theres no water in the oilpan.  This possiblity though is down the road from all the other advice....
  2. Like
    JayEstes reacted to Rich Ackermann in Best way to prep engine bay for paint   
    I thought I add my two cents to this thread...
    I use Evaporust on just about every rusty part I can. Even if I plan to media blast the part as it cuts down on the basting time. Evaporust is bio degradable and will not remove paint marks provided the paint is not over rust. My favorite examples are 1973 Mustang driveshaft where the paint marks were very visible after soaking in Evaporust for 4-5 days, the parking brake pedal and the clutch on my York A/C Compressor, which I wanted to retain a natural finish on it and could not use any gritty material to clean it..
    Someone mentioned Dustless sand blasting. I had my 70 Mach 1 Dustless Blasted in my driveway by a service. First I'll say Dustless is misleading...No dust but very messy.  Since they use a water solution of sand and a rust inhibitor, it prevents heating and warping of the metal and prevents flash rust for weeks provided the car is kept dry indoors. It's important to shake and blow out all the blasting material from every nook and cranny. I was removing the basting material from the rockers and rails for week afterwards. I wish I could have dipped the car in a big vat of Evaporust, but that much Evaporust would have been very expensive!
    Once the sheetmetal work was done, I sprayed the undercarriage, floors, engine bay, wheel wells, inside the doors, and trunk area with SPI Red Epoxy, which is designed to be applied over bare metal. They have gray and black if you don't like red. I then covered the floors, inside the doors, underside of roof, and wheel wells with Raptor bed-liner. Raptor provides very good rust protection for the floors and other hidden areas subject prone to rust. You can get Raptor in various colors or in a tintable version, if you want to use your body color. On the Undercarriage and the wheel wells again, I applied Lizard-Skin over the red Epoxy for sound deadening and to give it a textured "undercoating like" appearance. Lizard Skin is gray in color rather than black, which I was not happy about. Later I also applied 3M rubber undercoating to the wheel wells to give it a more stock like texture and appearance in black.
    Finally on the engine bay I sprayed Eastwood Chassis Black over the SPI Red Epoxy.
    EvapoRust at work... I used a 4" wide PVC tube, stuck the driveshaft it it, and capped the ends after filling it with the stuff. LEft it for a week or so...

    Submerged the parking brake assembly in Evaporust...

    Submerged the just the clutch face down in a pan of Evaporust...

    My 73 Convertible done with SPI Red Epoxy on the undercarriage.

    My 70 Mach 1 undercarriage with SPI Red Epoxy ...

    Gray colored Lizard-Skin over the SPI Red Epoxy. I did not like the gray color in the wheel wells, so the wheel wells were sprayed with the Red Epoxy, then the gray lizard-skin, and then black 3M Rubber undercoating. Hopefully good rust protection and some sound deadening.

    Engine bay with Eastwood Chasis Black over SPI Red Epoxy

    Raptor on the floors I used premixed Caution Orange instead of the tintable type. I thought it was close to the car's Calypso Coral body color. Kind of bright, but no one will see it once the interior is in...lol!

    Dustless Basting in my driveway... no dust, but a big cleanup job afterwards....

  3. Like
    JayEstes reacted to lalojamesliz in Best way to prep engine bay for paint   
    I got the new front section in and today I plan to clean up what's left.  I was considering a paint gun with part A and B primer and ..... then I remembered @JayEstes gave me all of this great info on what specifically to use and not to over complicate this like I usually do.  Ordering 4 of the primer and 4 of the paint. I hope it's enough.  This will be for everything I can touch while inside the engine bay. Just not the frame rails. That will be with the bed liner. I don't plan to use seam sealer. 
    For the underside, wheel wells and under the fenders I ordered some raptor bed spray liner. My son sprayed that on his trucks bed and it's holding up great and it's been over a year at least. Even the thin coated areas I told him to hit again and he didn't look good still and the sun is always on it. 
    I'm off today, kids are at school, wife is on her online classes and studying and it's not hot yet...... time to get to work. 

  4. Like
    JayEstes reacted to 1969_Mach1 in Manual transmission rebuild - final checks   
    That shouldn't be a problem.  When I rebuilt mine I ended needing new gears, etc. like you went through.  At times on the bench it looked like a brass blocker ring might stick to a gear.  But, it works fine.  When doing your final checks on the bench all I can add is make certain everything is well lubricated with a GL4 rated gear oil (not GL5 or GL4 and GL5 rated).  I also used a trans assembly lube for assembly as it has a low melting point and mixes with the oil.  Greases for assembly will never melt and mix in.  So with greases any metal shavings from a fresh rebuilt (which will happen) will stick to the grease and won't drain out with the oil.
    Be certain to change the oil frequently to get any metal particles out.  They say 500 miles, I've changed mine twice in about 100 miles.  So far okay.
    Initially I had a trans shop rebuild mine, they used grease for assembly and didn't inform me to change the oil soon after use.  After a few hundred miles metal particles from the rebuild ruined the rear bearing and the inside of the case was completely coated with grease and embedded metal particles. 
  5. Like
    JayEstes reacted to Brian Conway in Manual transmission rebuild - final checks   
    My 69 RUG AE2 trans has a drain plug.  In that OE plug are installed a pair of small magnets.  Pretty clever of the manufacturer to think of that.  Brian

  6. Like
    JayEstes reacted to EastYorkStang in WTB - 69 coupe QTR Moldings + Upper Door Still plate cover and brakcets   
    Since you’ve got to Chrome the new 3D piece. What would it take to modify what you already have then rechrome the fixed piece. 
  7. Sad
    JayEstes got a reaction from RPM in What did you do to/for your Mustang today?   
    I don’t know if there is a correct emoji for “wince”.  Guess it coulda been worse???  Ugh yuck! Prayers for your mess there brother!
  8. Like
    JayEstes reacted to TexasEd in What did you do to/for your Mustang today?   
    Fourth of July weekend fun




  9. Thanks
    JayEstes got a reaction from Rich Ackermann in Air Cleaner Vacuum Motor Question   
    Man, that really is some great feedback.  I love when guys that have plumbed the depths of the rabbit hole wrap it all up for ya.  You deserve an award for that Rich!
  10. Like
    JayEstes reacted to Mach1 Driver in Best way to prep engine bay for paint   
    I see the Rust-Oleum even has a professional grade of this stuff that is a 2k epoxy, but it appears to be very textured.
  11. Haha
    JayEstes reacted to SHELBY69 in Does your car smoke ?   
    Above 70mph she’s terrifying. Lots of steering wander but she’s a fantastic low speed cruiser.
  12. Like
    JayEstes reacted to Ridge Runner in Does your car smoke ?   
    C4 torque converter seals like to leak if they sit to long ,they drip right on the h pipe 
  13. Like
    JayEstes reacted to Rich Ackermann in Air Cleaner Vacuum Motor Question   
    I am late replying to this topic, but just in case it is helpful in the future.  You can test the vacuum actuator using a brake bleeder pump. The vacuum actuator should hold at least 13lbs of vacuum without dropping (fast or slow). If it does not hold the vacuum then the rubber diaphragm inside is bad.  I have disassemble them in the past and repaired originals by sacrificing a cheaper plastic version. I take the diaphragm from the donor and replace the old one in the original. The hardest part is separating the actuator cap from the base. Make sure you have no leaks with the new diaphragm as it is sealed to the base.
    Here are some brands of actuators that are very close to the originals in appearance and function that may still be available. Three things to look for when buy an aftermarket actuator the orientation of the tab with the mounting hole (should be at 11:00 with the vacuum hose port at 12:00) and the opposite tab (is at 5:00) to the vacuum hose port. The orientation and length of the hook that connects to the snorkel flapper. Finally the vacuum hose port size... some are larger in diameter.
    Some of the all metal Ford Air Cleaner Vacuum Motor correct type actuators are:
    Niehoff FE703 AC Vacuum Air Cleaner Motor Actuator
    Avatar VM 263 Vacuum Air Cleaner Motor Actuator
    Borg Warner EC518 D7TZ-9D612B Vacuum Air Cleaner Motor Actuator
    Borg Warner EC517 BWD Air Cleaner Vacuum Actuator Motor VA13 ---is incorrect because the mount tab is at 1 o'clock instead of 11 o'clock
    Some of the pictures are from when I restored a 1973 Mustang with Ram Air, but all actuators are basically all the same.


    A factory original 1973 date coded (D73) Ford Snorkel Actuator I repaired as I described above.


    1971 - 1973 Mustang Ram Air plenum actuator example. Using a no longer available repro from NPD as a model, I took a snorkel actuator removed the tabs from the new actuator base and made a new base from sheet metal with the correct tabs needed for the ram air plenum. I then glued the new base to the new actuator with body glue. I then finished it in yellow chromate although the originals were mostly silver.

  14. Like
    JayEstes got a reaction from lalojamesliz in Best way to prep engine bay for paint   
    I might add that you don't really need a primer under that truckbed liner..  It'll go right onto bare metal (as long as it is really clean and dry I always wipe with laquer thinner or IPA right before applying) and it sticks hard.  Great stuff - even if a little expensive - IMO.
     
  15. Like
    JayEstes got a reaction from lalojamesliz in Best way to prep engine bay for paint   
    I prefer Duplicor's engine paint primer.  

     
    And I use Duplicolors' ford semi-gloss black engine paint everywhere too.   If you're careful with this sprayer, you can get a very nice finish with the semi-gloss black:
     
     
    And for the truckbed liner, I use Rustoleum.  I find it is not anywhere near as rough as what you would see in a truckbed, in fact, the surface is not even very orange peely, but it is in some sense "rough" as compared to paint.  Good thing is, if you put it down on a good primer or primer or bare metal... it is not coming off, and it is hard a nails! 

    I've had mine in the wheel wells for about 15Kmi now.  I just went and wiped the road dirt off with a damp towel, and this is what it looks like behind the drivers wheel:

    Now, for caulk?  I am struggling to remember..  I wanted something that dried pretty hard and would accept paint.  I didn't want it too silicon-ized because even cured that stuff is very rubbery.  I found something at the HW store, but damn if I can recall what it was....  It needs to be something a little more flexible that JB weld, but significantly less than silicone (if JB weld is a 1, and 100% silicone is 10, you want to get something in the 3 to 4 range.  This is so the paint or bed liner wont chip off the caulked surface easily.  And you don't want it too hard because as the body panels move relative to one another (pot holes on teh road or whatever, it needs to give some).  and when you put it in and it's cured, I cover with primer paint or truckbed liner immediately, so it has a fresh surface to bond to.
    Hope that helps.
    Jay
  16. Thanks
    JayEstes reacted to Mach1 Driver in Best way to prep engine bay for paint   
    Thanks, that was very helpful.
  17. Like
    JayEstes got a reaction from Mach1 Driver in Best way to prep engine bay for paint   
    I prefer Duplicor's engine paint primer.  

     
    And I use Duplicolors' ford semi-gloss black engine paint everywhere too.   If you're careful with this sprayer, you can get a very nice finish with the semi-gloss black:
     
     
    And for the truckbed liner, I use Rustoleum.  I find it is not anywhere near as rough as what you would see in a truckbed, in fact, the surface is not even very orange peely, but it is in some sense "rough" as compared to paint.  Good thing is, if you put it down on a good primer or primer or bare metal... it is not coming off, and it is hard a nails! 

    I've had mine in the wheel wells for about 15Kmi now.  I just went and wiped the road dirt off with a damp towel, and this is what it looks like behind the drivers wheel:

    Now, for caulk?  I am struggling to remember..  I wanted something that dried pretty hard and would accept paint.  I didn't want it too silicon-ized because even cured that stuff is very rubbery.  I found something at the HW store, but damn if I can recall what it was....  It needs to be something a little more flexible that JB weld, but significantly less than silicone (if JB weld is a 1, and 100% silicone is 10, you want to get something in the 3 to 4 range.  This is so the paint or bed liner wont chip off the caulked surface easily.  And you don't want it too hard because as the body panels move relative to one another (pot holes on teh road or whatever, it needs to give some).  and when you put it in and it's cured, I cover with primer paint or truckbed liner immediately, so it has a fresh surface to bond to.
    Hope that helps.
    Jay
  18. Like
    JayEstes got a reaction from Mach1 Driver in Best way to prep engine bay for paint   
    Here is something you can try.  I found the near final prep phase that worked great for me was a small pan of lacquer thinner and a scotch bite pad and a cloth rag.  From the pics I see, you are close to or at the stage I would revert to the scotchbrite pad with lacquer thinner technique.  Once you have most of the big crud removed (I would say you are definitely there).  I would get a 1 qt disposable tupperware and fill it halfway with lacquer thinner.  I get the best and thickest pair of gloves I can find (PVC gloves are the only thing that ever provided much protection from the strong lacquer thinner).  Nitrile will melt instantly so don't use that, and other rubber gloves may work for awhile.  Even the PVC gets hard and crunchy after several uses, but for the most part it protected my hands.
    Just dip the pad in lacquer thinner and gently rub the surface with it.  After you have scrubbed an area briefly, a lot of crud and grease and oil will be released.  dip the rag in the same stuff and wipe away the crud.  examine the surface and feel of it with a bare hand after the lacquer thinner has evaporated.  The goal is NOT to remove everything (it will do that if you keep rubbing!) but to leave the surface with 1 or 3 things: 1) a very clean and smooth original paint layer, 2) a very clean and smooth original primer layer, or 3) bare metal.  For myself the goal is to get to stage 1 or 2, but avoid 3 where you can.  As long as the metal is good and the primer and paint are original, and you have all the dirt and crud off - you are good to coat with the base layer of your new primer.  Where everything is stripped down to bare metal, just make sure the surface feels smooth with areas that have primer or primer & paint on them.
    Once I have a whole section ready using the lacquer thinner + scotch brite pad followed by lacquer thinner + rag , I would rattle can engine primer over the surface I had just prepared.  Do it early because the laquer thinner softens the paint/primer and scratches the surfaces and you get a great bond with that new primer base.  And you want to do it before it can get dirty again or rust starts setting back in (this can happen literally overnight).
    When I did my engine compartment, I followed this work by going back in and caulking up the metal seams with a hard/firm long-lasting caulk that would accept paint (be sure not to caulk lower edges so if water comes in from the other side it can drain back out).  When that dried, I put a full coat of primer over the top of that, and then the paint.  I got really exceptional results doing this and it was not a ton of work.
    One caution is that this method will put a TON of black paint/oil/dirt sludge on the ground under where you are working.  Your shoes and pants will get coated, and if you don't put down a drop cloth or large cardboard, it will blacken your floor good.  Do the prepwork by covering the ground under you well before you do this work.   I wound up wearing tyvek overalls for this work.  It's messy but satisfying.
    For RUST:  I have used Ospho a lot.  I have found another good solution - perhaps even better - but it works a little slower.  That is Evaporust.  The instructions call for you to soak a paper towel or something with it and soak it through, then lay the towel over the rusted metal.  I find that it needs to sit overnight, and if the rust is bad, the next day I brush and clean it as much as possible and do it again.  One benefit over ospho is that it doesn't leave behind the white powder when it dries.  One downside maybe expense.  However, a friend told be he got a gallon of it for $17 on amazon.  I use this mostly for nuts and bolts - the fluid can be reused many times if you are using it as a dipping fluid.
     
  19. Like
    JayEstes got a reaction from lalojamesliz in Best way to prep engine bay for paint   
    Under the fenders, (after I cleaned them well with a wire brush on a 4in grinder wheel), I wiped it down with lacquer thinner to clean, and put a good coat of rattle can primer on.  Immediately thereafter I applied some rattle can truck bed liner - I am SUPER happy with the rattle can truck bed liner under the fenders... It's tough as a boot and cleans off really easily!  I'm 4-5 yrs hence now and I have zero complaints with that stuff! 
  20. Thanks
    JayEstes got a reaction from lalojamesliz in Best way to prep engine bay for paint   
    Here is something you can try.  I found the near final prep phase that worked great for me was a small pan of lacquer thinner and a scotch bite pad and a cloth rag.  From the pics I see, you are close to or at the stage I would revert to the scotchbrite pad with lacquer thinner technique.  Once you have most of the big crud removed (I would say you are definitely there).  I would get a 1 qt disposable tupperware and fill it halfway with lacquer thinner.  I get the best and thickest pair of gloves I can find (PVC gloves are the only thing that ever provided much protection from the strong lacquer thinner).  Nitrile will melt instantly so don't use that, and other rubber gloves may work for awhile.  Even the PVC gets hard and crunchy after several uses, but for the most part it protected my hands.
    Just dip the pad in lacquer thinner and gently rub the surface with it.  After you have scrubbed an area briefly, a lot of crud and grease and oil will be released.  dip the rag in the same stuff and wipe away the crud.  examine the surface and feel of it with a bare hand after the lacquer thinner has evaporated.  The goal is NOT to remove everything (it will do that if you keep rubbing!) but to leave the surface with 1 or 3 things: 1) a very clean and smooth original paint layer, 2) a very clean and smooth original primer layer, or 3) bare metal.  For myself the goal is to get to stage 1 or 2, but avoid 3 where you can.  As long as the metal is good and the primer and paint are original, and you have all the dirt and crud off - you are good to coat with the base layer of your new primer.  Where everything is stripped down to bare metal, just make sure the surface feels smooth with areas that have primer or primer & paint on them.
    Once I have a whole section ready using the lacquer thinner + scotch brite pad followed by lacquer thinner + rag , I would rattle can engine primer over the surface I had just prepared.  Do it early because the laquer thinner softens the paint/primer and scratches the surfaces and you get a great bond with that new primer base.  And you want to do it before it can get dirty again or rust starts setting back in (this can happen literally overnight).
    When I did my engine compartment, I followed this work by going back in and caulking up the metal seams with a hard/firm long-lasting caulk that would accept paint (be sure not to caulk lower edges so if water comes in from the other side it can drain back out).  When that dried, I put a full coat of primer over the top of that, and then the paint.  I got really exceptional results doing this and it was not a ton of work.
    One caution is that this method will put a TON of black paint/oil/dirt sludge on the ground under where you are working.  Your shoes and pants will get coated, and if you don't put down a drop cloth or large cardboard, it will blacken your floor good.  Do the prepwork by covering the ground under you well before you do this work.   I wound up wearing tyvek overalls for this work.  It's messy but satisfying.
    For RUST:  I have used Ospho a lot.  I have found another good solution - perhaps even better - but it works a little slower.  That is Evaporust.  The instructions call for you to soak a paper towel or something with it and soak it through, then lay the towel over the rusted metal.  I find that it needs to sit overnight, and if the rust is bad, the next day I brush and clean it as much as possible and do it again.  One benefit over ospho is that it doesn't leave behind the white powder when it dries.  One downside maybe expense.  However, a friend told be he got a gallon of it for $17 on amazon.  I use this mostly for nuts and bolts - the fluid can be reused many times if you are using it as a dipping fluid.
     
  21. Thanks
    JayEstes reacted to RPM in Radiator drain solution?   
    I do Sam Ting. 1/2" I.D. tube I believe. 
  22. Haha
    JayEstes reacted to Mach1 Driver in Removing old rotors....help   
    D'oh, we all have our Homer moments ;)

  23. Like
    JayEstes reacted to Caseyrhe in Radiator drain solution?   
    I will slide a hose over the end of the petcock, flows right into the catch/recycle pan.
  24. Like
    JayEstes reacted to dream car in Radiator drain solution?   
    Dont know what size you need. found this on Amazon for $2.52  search- Dorman 61106 drain cock
  25. Like
    JayEstes reacted to aslanefe in Radiator drain solution?   
    I cut a plastic water or soda bottle like a funnel, drill 2 holes and tie a wire then attach it to the drain and direct the end of make shift funnel to a bucket or catch pan.
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