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maxum96

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maxum96 last won the day on July 7

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About maxum96

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    v8 powered poster
  • Birthday 01/01/1967

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    N. Colorado

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  1. I put a Hurst Quarter Stick shift in a 1970 Mustang I had years ago. First thing you do is remove the stock shifter and linkage. You'll have to fabricate a metal plate to block off the hole where the stock shifter goes. Then you locate where you want to mount the Hurst shifter on the transmission tunnel. Then you have to drill holes for the mounting screws for the shifter. Then you have to make a hole for the shift cable. You should be able to run the cable through the block off plate you fabricated. Then you have to route your shifter cable. The stock cable I had was way too long and I had a custom shift cable made. Then you have to hook the cable up to the transmission. You need to make sure you have a the correct shifter for your transmission. In other words, make sure you don't have a reverse pattern shifter with a standard pattern valve body transmission or vice versa.
  2. I bought a template recently on ebay. Numerous sellers had the templates.
  3. As Brian already said, that's not a crack but a drain slot. That's just a heat shield to keep the hot oil off the bottom of the intake under the carb. As mentioned already, you can pop out those twist rivets and c clean out the gunk inside there if you so desire. If you choose not to, it won't hurt your engine or performance at all.
  4. Back in the 1980's a buddy of mine dropped a stock 460 into a 1970 Mach 1 Q code 4 speed. His car was missing the 428CJ. The car was not that fast. Spark plug changes were not fun. Even though it was already a big block car, he had to do a lot of changes to get the 385 series (429/460) engine to work in the car. I almost dropped a stock 429 into a previous 70 Sportsroof I had back in the 1980's. I ended up putting a mildly built 351C in my car instead. I'm glad I didn't put the 429 in the car.
  5. Intake manifold or if need be, use a thermostat housing with a threaded hole for a sending unit, similar to RPM's photo.
  6. The factory temp gauge is pretty much useless to determine the actual engine temp. My 2019 F350 pickup's factory temp gauge is no better. I'd have the first fan come on at 195 and second one maybe 200.
  7. Glad to see I'm not the only one with that issue. I'm going to need to "pie cut" my brackets. I had to do that for the bumper braces inside the trunk because they did not sit flat on the tail light panel
  8. I had to pull the transmission to address an oil leak today. I figured a short video with open headers before I bolted the exhaust back on was in order. I didn't rev it more than about 3,500 rpm.
  9. Thanks for the info. I recently found out I have a deluxe clock dash complete with clock in my stash of parts. I think I'm going to do a deluxe interior when I get to that point with my car.
  10. I know I'm a little late to the conversation, but I too used a 5.0 thermostat housing on my 393W. It worked out perfect with my oversized radiator.
  11. Randy, do all stock non-tach 1970 dash harnesses have the provision for have a factory clocked plugged into them?
  12. I have all Autometer gauges in an aftermarket instrument panel. I had to wire them in to the stock harness. That was not a big deal as the only things I need were 12V power, instrument light, and fuel gauge sending wire. I run a mechanical water temp and oil pressure gauges along with an electronic speedometer. My tach is wired into my MSD box velcro'd to the passenger side cowl above the vent.
  13. I just bought this a few months ago. Aluminum body, 15/16" bore with SAE ports. I had to buy 2 adapters from the auto parts store to connect to my brake lines. https://www.autozone.com/brakes-and-traction-control/master-cylinder-brake-system/p/duralast-new-brake-master-cylinder-nm2203/140290_0_0
  14. I recently had the opposite problem, my brake lights were staying on. I figured out it was my aftermarket brake pushrod I'd just installed. The backside of the pushrod ring (where it attaches to your brake pedal) has a flat area. This is what contacts the brake light switch and activates it. In my case, the flat area was too thick and I just shaved it down about .030 to get the brake lights not to stick on. I suspect you have the opposite issue, too much play. Check the plastic bushing the brake pushrod uses where it attaches to the pedal. Perhaps you need to shim the brake light switch? I saw this done and they used a piece of thin metal folded around the face of the brake switch contact area.
  15. I've always liked Mavericks and Comets. I've seen some modern interpretations of them that looked very tasteful. But all the Shelby scoops and ornaments on this one looks cheesy and gaudy to me.
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